Social Studies

EDUC 50910: PEDAGOGY AND PRACTICE IN THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES

Fall 2014; 03 Credit Hours

Zenon V. Wasyliw                                                                              

Professor, Department of History and

Department of Education

Ithaca College

Muller 427

wasyliw@ithaca.edu  274-1587 or 274-3303                                                            

http://faculty.ithaca.edu/wasyliw                                                            

Office Hours: Monday 12:00-1:00; Tuesday 4:00-5:00

Thursday 1:00-2:00

By appointment other days and times

I am often in my office additional times

Come in if you see my office door open

Class Meeting Time: Monday 1:00-3:50

Catalog Course Description:

Examination of current research and practice in the effective teaching of social studies at the middle and high school levels. Focus on national and state standards in social studies, mastery of theoretical concepts and their application in the classroom, instructional planning and differentiation, appropriate use of technology, approaches to assessment, and the integration of literacy in the social studies curriculum. Introduction to professional organizations, journals, and resources. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing or permission of instructor. 3 credits. (F, Y)

 

All-College Teacher Education Mission:

The All-College Teacher Education Unit at Ithaca College embraces the values of Knowledge, Competence, and Commitment to Service. Our mission is to prepare teachers who possess knowledge and teaching competence in their respective disciplines, who know how to work collaboratively and effectively with diverse communities of students and families, and who are inspired and motivated by the belief that excellence and equity in education are profoundly interdependent. To this end, Ithaca College teacher educators guide candidates through carefully designed and supervised programs where theory, research, and practice combine in order to provide them with solid foundations in the content, professional, pedagogical, technological, relational, and cultural knowledge and experiences needed in order to become engaged and effective teachers for all students in the 21st century.

 

The values and commitments found in the Unit’s Conceptual Framework are embedded in the following Ithaca College Teacher Education Program Standards. These eight Standards, when aligned with the New York State Teaching Standards and the Specialized Professional Association Standards, ensure that the All-College Teacher Education Unit’s goals of Knowledge, Competence, and Commitment to Service are attained. The Ithaca College Teacher Education Program Standards reflect the shared values and expectations of our teacher education faculty and stakeholders and are used to assess the readiness of every teacher education candidate at Ithaca College.

 

Ithaca College Teacher Education Professional Standards (IC TEPS)

Standard 1 - Content Knowledge: Ithaca College teaching professionals demonstrate a rich, thorough understanding of the content and skill knowledge, theories, and issues comprising their disciplines.

Standard 2 - Planning and Instruction/Implementation: Ithaca College teaching professionals are able to plan and implement effective, developmentally appropriate lessons and curricula based upon sound principles of content knowledge and skill development.

Standard 3 - Positive Learning Environment: Ithaca College teaching professionals create safe and motivational learning environments that encourage all students to become actively involved.

Standard 4 - Diversity: Ithaca College teaching professionals respect and possess knowledge of diversity in its many forms and know how to use this competence to develop relationships, instruction, schools, classrooms, communities and experiences that help all students achieve to their fullest potential and function effectively and respectfully in a diverse world.            

Standard 5 - Technology: Ithaca College teaching professionals are able to effectively utilize technology to enhance student learning and professional growth and development.

Standard 6 - Assessment: Ithaca College teaching professionals demonstrate the ability to develop and utilize a variety of assessment tools and techniques designed to evaluate student learning and performance, provide feedback, and shape future lesson planning, programs, and curricula.

Standard 7 - Collaboration and Outreach: Ithaca College teaching professionals foster positive relationships with a variety of target groups (e.g. students, families, colleagues, local community members, etc.) in order to promote and enhance the teaching and learning environment.

Standard 8 - Professional Development: Ithaca College teaching professionals engage in reflective practice and continually seek to improve their knowledge base and effectiveness as teachers, make positive contributions to the culture of their fields, and demonstrate the dispositions of an emerging professional.

 

Department of Education Mission:

Grounded in the rich traditions of the liberal arts and social sciences, and in keeping with the Ithaca College mission statement, the Department of Education prepares students to take responsibility for citizenship and service in the global community. This preparation takes place in several ways. The Department seeks to develop future teachers who are not only well-educated in their disciplines, but are also culturally responsive, caring, and knowledgeable in their interactions with students and their families. The Department also reaches out to the larger Ithaca College student body through courses and programs designed to equip them with the necessary skills for well-informed, critically reflective, participatory citizenship and service in their neighborhood schools and communities.  In addition, faculty and students in the Department of Education value, support, and engage in collaboration, discussion, and dialogue with a variety of local and regional community partners in order to be of assistance in addressing educational issues of concern and importance to them. In these ways, knowledge, competence, and service come together in our students to nurture a lifelong commitment to the democratic quest for excellence and equity in our schools and society.

 

Course Objectives, Goals and Purposes:

This course emphasizes teaching grades 7-12 social studies at the middle and secondary levels with special reference to the New York State Social Studies curriculum and the five Social Studies learning standards.  We also infuse the NCSS (National Council for the Social Studies) National Standards for Social Studies Teachers, aligning our program with NCATE (National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education) requirements.  This course examines and applies subject-specific methods and materials, including the assessment of student work, and teaching middle and secondary school students of varying needs, backgrounds, interests and levels of academic preparation.  Conceptualizing, organizing, presenting, and evaluating historical and social science content through curriculum development, instructional planning and strategies is particularly important.  This course introduces the practical application of history and each social science in relation to specific curricular demands through the framework of learning processes, motivation, communication and classroom management.  Instructional technology, literacy in the social studies, and the action research process are also integrated through a variety of applications. Mastery of both theoretical concepts and their application in the classroom is essential.  This class often meets in a public school setting with a significant field experience component

 

Required Readings:

D’Souza, Dinesh.  What’s So Great about America.

Loewen, James W. Teaching What Really Happened

Kottler, Ellen and Nancy P. Gallavan, Secrets to Success for Social Studies Teachers

Stearns, Peter, Peter Seixas and Sam Weinburg, Knowing Teaching and Learning History.

 

Grade Explanations:

A=       Clearly exceptional work for an undergraduate student. Outstanding, original, excellent.

B=       Above average work for an undergraduate student. Very good, consistently thoughtful,

            and analytical.

C=       Average work for an undergraduate student. Met minimum requirements, intermittently

thoughtful, insightful, and/or analytical. Satisfactory.

D=       See me immediately for individual help. Not acceptable work.

F=        See me immediately.  Failure to meet minimal expectations.

 

Grading for this course will be based on the following:

Two Social Studies unit plans, 25% each unit                                                  50%

Comparative book critique, Mentor teacher journal                                         20%

Graduate Project and three article evaluations                                                 15%

Participation, presentations, weekly journal, FDA                                           15%                                                                                                                                                    100%

 

Assignment Details:

1. Candidates must engage in quality discussions of assigned readings and must complete all written assignments.

2. Attendance is mandatory.  There are no un-excused absences.  “Students at Ithaca College are expected to attend all classes, and they are responsible for work missed during any absence from class.” Ithaca College Catalog, 2011-12).

http://www.ithaca.edu/provost/docs/apc/apcapprovepolicies/AttendancePolicy.pdf

3. Candidates complete two unit plans, one in United States history and one in global history both directly related to the spring student teaching assignment.  The units must include detailed innovative lesson plans with evidence of strong content mastery, infused with instructional technology and support for adolescent literacy and varied assessment strategies for diverse learners. 

Candidates will identify, assess and apply the ten thematic NCSS standards and the five New York State Social Studies Standards through the construction of curriculum units. 

http://downloads.ncss.org/NCSSTeacherStandardsVol1-rev2004.pdf

http://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/home.html

 

One-week Curriculum Unit in U.S. History and Civic Engagement/Government

Students are required to demonstrate content and pedagogical content knowledge related to NCSS standards 1.1 (Culture and Cultural Diversity) 1.2 (Time, Continuity and Change) 1.3 (People, Places and Environment) 1.5 (Individuals, Groups and Institutions) 1.6 (Power, Authority and Governance) 1.8 (Science, Technology and Society) 1.10 (Civic Ideas and Practices). New York State Standards in US History and Government are met.

 

One-week Curriculum Unit in Global History, Geography and Economics

Students are requires to demonstrate content and pedagogical content knowledge related to 1.1 (Culture and Cultural Diversity) 1.2 (Time, Continuity and Change) 1.3 (People, Places and Environment) 1.5 (Individuals, Groups and Institutions) 1.7 (Production, Distribution and Consumption) 1.9 (Global Connections). New York State Standards in Global History, Geography and Economics are met.

The Economics Standard and NCSS 1.7 can be alternatively assessed within the U.S. History Unit

Lesson Reflection

After the lesson has been taught, discuss any adaptations you made while teaching this lesson or plan to make if this lesson is repeated in the future. Explain why you made (or would make, in the future) these changes. How were these changes informed by your students’ learning?

 

Lesson Plan Format for Teacher Education Candidates

Ithaca  College School of Humanities and Sciences

Overview without Detailed Directions

 

file:///C:/Users/wasyliw/Downloads/Lesson%20Plan%20Overview%20HS%20062414.pdf

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plan Format for Teacher Education Candidates

Ithaca College School of Humanities and Sciences
 

Name

 

Lesson Title or Topic

 

Grade Level

 

Course Name or Content Area

 

 

Context

1. Explain the larger context in which this lesson fits.  For example, explain what larger unit would be going on at the time of this lesson and how this lesson fits into the unit. 

2. State the long-range learning objective/s to which this lesson contributes. The long-range objectives should deal with mastery of knowledge/skills that students will be able to transfer to real-life situations. 

3. Describe the students for whom this lesson has been developed.  Consider the personal, cultural, and community assets of your students.

 

Central Focus

Identify the central focus for the content/skill you will teach in this learning segment (a lesson or series of lessons). The central focus should address the important understandings and core concepts/skills you want student to develop in this lesson or series of lessons.

 

State/National Content Standards (Common Core State Standards)

List the number and full text of each standard that is addressed in this lesson.

Remember to include content and literacy standards, as appropriate to the lesson.

 

Objectives and Assessments

--Here list the short-range learning objectives specific to this particular learning segment.  These objectives should be items that are immediately observable and easily assessed.

--In addition, you will identify how you will know if the learning objectives have been met. List the types of assessments you will use to determine whether the objectives have been met. List the types of formative assessments you will use to monitor student learning of your short-range learning objectives for this lesson. What assessments will determine proficiency, excellence, or failure to meet the learning objectives?

--As you consider your assessments, you should think about the kind(s) of feedback your students will receive from you related to your assessments and how will you expect them to use this feedback.

Learning Objectives

The students will be able to …

 

 

 

 

 

Note: If you have more than 3 learning objectives, add a new row for each objective.

Formative Assessments

What evidence will you gather during the lesson to monitor whether your students are developing the understanding/skills required to meet the learning objective you have identified?

Note: Every objective should have a formative assessment.

Summative Assessments

What evidence, by the end of this learning segment, will show that students understand and have met your learning objectives?

 

Note: You might have duplicative assessments, or no summative assessments, for your learning objectives in this lesson.

1.

1.

1.

2.

2.

2.

3.

3.

3.

Prior Knowledge

What knowledge, skills, and concepts must students already know to be successful with this lesson?

How will you know if your students have prior knowledge, etc.?  Where will you teach/re-teach if necessary?

 

 

       

 

Academic Language

Academic language function

Choose one of these higher order language verbs (or another appropriate to your learning objectives): analyze, evaluate, explain, interpret, describe, predict, argue, or prove.  How will you help them do this verb (a.k.a academic language function) during or as a result of this lesson?  (Include how you will use students’ prior knowledge and your teaching in this lesson to facilitate and deepen student learning of this academic language skill.)

 

Language demands

What skill vocabulary (e.g., Venn diagram, graphic organizer, thesis statement) and content vocabulary (e.g., imperialism, mitosis) do students need to know in order to succeed?

Language supports

How will you help students understand the verbal and written language requirements to succeed in this lesson? (These should also be included in your step-by-step procedures below.)

 

 

 

Lesson Procedures: Instructional Strategies/ Learning Tasks

Describe, in detail, the steps you will follow in the lesson, attending to both what you will be doing and what the students will be doing. Boldface all procedures where you are monitoring student understanding using formative assessments.

Opening

How will you begin your lesson in a way that motivates and engages students in learning this lesson’s content? (Motivation for lessons should be interesting, age-level appropriate, brief, and directly related to the learning objectives of the lesson.)

1.

Step-by-Step Procedures

Time

List the next steps of your lesson. Provide detailed description of what teacher and students will be doing.  Boldface those procedures where teacher is monitoring student understanding during the lesson. (Your planned formative assessments from above should show up In this section as part of your lesson procedures.) Add rows below as needed.

Write lesson plan procedures so that another teacher could pick up your plans and actually accomplish your objectives for the class period.  (Hint: The following procedural terms are too vague: introduce, discuss, review.  How will you introduce something new?  How will you organize discussion, and what questions will you ask?  How will you conduct a review?) 

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

Closure

How will you bring this lesson to closure? How will students reflect on what they learned today, and how will you prepare them for what’s ahead?

6.

 

Differentiation

Universal Design

What general features of your procedures and/or assessment help support the learning of all students by making the lesson appropriate, feasible, and supportive for every student in the class?

 

Students with Specific Learning Needs (to be completed below)

What are some of the specific learning needs possessed by students in your class, and how do your plans intentionally support these students’ learning? Connect your support to the specific step-by-step procedures listed above (included the step number where you will adapt, if appropriate).

IEP/ 504 Plans (classifications/needs)

 

Supports, Accommodations, Modifications, Pertinent IEP Goals

 

 

Other Learning Needs

Examples: Struggling readers, English language learners, gifted students, etc.

Supports, Accommodations, Modifications

 

 

 

Instructional Resources/Materials

List here the resources you will use to engage students in learning.

Include handouts, slides, supplies, images, grouping plans, manipulatives, equipment, or anything else that requires advance preparation. Written materials should be attached to this plan.

 

 

Theoretical Principles/ Research-Based Practices

What research/theory supports your lesson design? Explain.

 

References

Include here (1) the specific references for the research and theory cited in the section above, and (2) any professional resources from which one or more parts of this plan have been borrowed/adapted. (If a mentor teacher shared plans, please credit him or her.)

 

 

Lesson Reflection

After the lesson has been taught, discuss any adaptations you made while teaching this lesson or plan to make if this lesson is repeated in the future. Explain why you made (or would make, in the future) these changes. How were these changes informed by your students’ learning?

 

 

 

 

**Designing a Unit Plan

Unit Plan Design: To maintain a consistent approach to lesson planning across all core education courses, the following components of a unit plan are required:Title of Unit: Create a title for your unit plan that makes clear its basic content.

Context: Indicate the subject/course, grade and level for which this unit has been developed. Include here information about (a) the contextual factors impacting the unit and (b) the intended learners for which this unit is planned.

Rationale: Explain the rationale for including this unit in the curriculum for this grade level. Why are you teaching this unit? What are the benefits for the students? 

State/National Standards Addressed: Specify which NCSS and New York state social studies standards are addressed in this unit plan.  Cite the standards by number, and provide a succinct description using the language of the standard.

Unit Goals: List the general overarching goal(s), theme(s), and/or essential questions for the unit as a whole.

Assessments: Provide an overview of the formative and summative assessments to be used in your unit. Include a culminating unit assessment that provides evidence of the effects of instruction on student learning. Explain your rationale for selecting/developing this particular approach to assessment for your unit. (Remember that your planned assessments should align with the standards and goals you have selected as being key to this unit.)  

Literacy: Identify the literacy objectives that will be taught as part of this unit.  Please reference the New York Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. Describe how you will integrate attention to these literacy objectives across your unit.  In what ways does your unit support the continuing literacy development of the students for whom you have planned this unit?  Consider the following: pre, during and post-reading activities; writing to learn across the curriculum; vocabulary development; oral language development; etc.

Technology: Describe the ways in which your unit incorporates the use of appropriate, effective technology to enhance student learning. 

Unit Plan Organization: The unit plan is comprised of a minimum number of lesson plans as specified by your instructor; for most courses a minimum of five lesson plans is required. Fill out a weekly content outline containing: learning objectives, assessments, basic procedures/activities, and any readings or homework for each day of the week (see next page for a basic structure for your content outline).

Lesson Plans: Each daily lesson plan in the unit must include:

  • all the components of a complete lesson as delineated in the Ithaca College “Designing a Lesson Plan” guidelines (see attached); each lesson plan must include differentiation.
  • all supplemental materials (e.g., PowerPoint slides, handouts, assessments with scoring guides). 

**Assessment rubrics are found at the end of the syllabus.

 

Each unit is selected in consultation with assigned mentors of the spring student teaching semester.  The ideal goal is to teach each unit during the spring student teaching professional semester. Mastery learning - students must make qualitative revisions of submitted units for inclusion in the final portfolio.

4. Candidates meet with and work closely with their assigned mentor teachers during this semester in preparation for their student teaching during the professional semester. Students observe their mentor teachers’ classes and co-teach several classes after close consultation.  A descriptive and reflective Mentor journal must be kept both chronicling and assessing this collaboration.  Students will share unit plans with mentors. Mentor collaborative field experience will total a minimum of ten hours.

5. Candidates must keep a weekly reflective journal summarizing and evaluating course assignments and activities. A class project will also involve developing a social studies teaching bulletin board on the fourth floor of Muller Faculty Center next to my office.

6. A comparative critique of the Loewen and D’Souza books.

7. Candidates will need to prepare and submit a formal lesson plan developed for and taught at FDA during Fall Break. More specific instructions will be shared prior to the FDA trip.

 

8. Candidates must submit a final portfolio containing two revised unit plans, mentor teacher journal, weekly reflective journal, evaluations of five most valuable websites, article evaluations and other required work.

9.  Article evaluation – Graduate level requirement of three articles from the Knowing Teaching and Learning History are to be carefully and critically evaluated in a four page analytical critique.

10.  Ithaca College and Local Social Studies Resources Project – Graduate level candidates will identify, in consultation with the instructor, Ithaca College and Ithaca area social studies related resources.  They will summarize and evaluate resource curricular connections to the National Council for the Social Studies Standards and New York State Social Studies Standards, identify useful connections to classroom teaching and assessment. The completed project will be published as an online resource link.  Resources include: Project Look Sharp, Aging in the Social Studies Curriculum, CSCRE, The Einaudi Center for International Studies at Cornell University, The History Center of Tompkins County and other potential resources.

11.  Graduate Action Research Based Project.  All candidates for the Master of Arts in Teaching are required to complete an action research based project that centers on significant practices in the content area.  This discipline-based project will be developed and researched in this course, implemented during the semester of student teaching, and assessed and critically reviewed in the seminar that accompanies student teaching and as part of the final portfolio.  This will be done in close collaboration with the Pedagogy and Practice across the Disciplines Seminar and the Director of Graduate Studies.  Graduate students will also serve as tutors with the Ithaca High School AVID program Advancement via Individual Determination also in collaboration with the Pedagogy and Practice across the Disciplines Seminar.

12.  Candidates are expected to become members of a professional Social Studies organization.  Membership in the New York State Council for the Social Studies (NYSCSS) is required http://www.nyscss.org/ and is only $15. Other optional memberships in the Middle States Council for the Social Studies, National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS), and the National Council for History Education (NCHE).

 

13.  The syllabus outline and assignments are subject to change.

 

14.  Alumni Networking Project.  We will work collaboratively with an existing list of connected alumni to determine possible online networking strategies to share information and offer advice.  The alumni are our social studies teaching and history graduates currently teaching or working in various education-related fields.  Our first Alumni-Mentor is Melissa Seideman and others will join us as the semester progresses. Candidates must register for her blog listed below.

We will be working with an Ithaca College Alumni-Mentor!

Melissa Seideman, a 2006 Social Studies Teacher Education graduate, has kindly agreed to serve as our first Pedagogy and Practice in the Teaching Social Studies Alumni Mentor.  We will add additional Alumni Mentors as the semester progresses.  Please follow Melissa’s instructions to subscribe to her blog and to follow the Monday evening Social Studies Twitter chat -

Blog: They can add it in Google Reader or subscribe to it (see steps 1 and 2) 

1. Go to http://notanotherhistoryteacher.edublogs.org/

2. Scroll down to "subscribe to this blog" and enter their email and click "subscribe"

Blog Contact: They can contact me via "comment" on any blog post and I will respond, send me a message in twitter, or click the "about me" page and click "contact me." I will respond either way! 

You need to stress Twitter. It has been the BEST forms of PD I have EVER found. 

--Tell them to add me on twitter and tweet me @mseideman 

-Every Monday Night 7-8 PM social studies teachers around the world follow #sschat Each week is a different question/prompt. After the chat I save so many useful websites, teaching handouts, lesson ideas that ACTUAL teachers have used. 

--Here is a post about  #sschat and the benefits of using twitter as a social studies teacher  http://www.sschat.org/

 

Additional Resources

New York State Social Studies Standards

https://www.engageny.org/resource/new-york-state-k-12-social-studies-framework  http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/home.html

National Council for the Social Studies and National Standards

http://www.socialstudies.org 

http://www.socialstudies.org/standards/strands  

National History Education

http://teachinghistory.org

World History Connected

http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/

National Center for History in the Schools

http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/nchs

Hacker/Fister, Documenting History Papers

http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/RES5e_ch10_s1-0001.html  

Social Studies History Teaching Resources

http://www.historyteacher.net

How to Write History Essays and do research

http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/index.htm

http://www.arts.cornell.edu/prh3/257/classmats/papertip.html

An essay writing guide from our Canadian friends -

http://www.historyandclassics.ualberta.ca/~/media/history/MainPage/GuideEssays.pdf

Literacy in Social Studies (includes very useful charts)

http://www.readingquest.org/strat

Media Literacy

http://www.projectlooksharp.org

 

Field Experience Record:

You will record our class field visits and most important your ten hours of field experiences with both assigned student teaching mentors (at least five hours with each mentor)

You should submit a record of your field experiences through Taskstream in the Teacher Education folio or online at http://tinyurl.com/ICfieldrecord.  You are responsible for submitting all of your field experience hours by deadline for this course. Answers to frequently asked questions are available in the Taskstream Teacher Education folio under the “Field Experience/Student Teaching Overview.”  If you have additional questions about how to submit hours, please contact the Field Experience Coordinator, Emily Hess, at ehess@ithaca.edu or 194 Phillips Hall Annex.

 

Student Disability Services:

In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, reasonable accommodation will be provided to students with documented disabilities on a case-by-case basis. Students must register with Student Disability Services and provide appropriate documentation to Ithaca College before any academic adjustment will be provided.

Statement on Academic Conduct:

The Ithaca College Policy Manual describes the Standards of Academic Content embedded in the Student Code of Conduct.  It is the responsibility of every student and faculty member to be familiar with, and comply with, these expectations for rigor, authenticity, trust, and honesty in academic work. You may find the full policy at the following web link:

http://www.ithaca.edu/policies/vol7/undergrad/070204/

As your instructor, I am responsible for reporting suspected academic dishonesty to the College, and students who are aware of—but do not report—academic dishonesty by others can be held responsible for failing to report it. We will discuss this policy more thoroughly in our course. As the Policy Manual states, “Because Ithaca College is an academic community, ignorance of the accepted standards of academic honesty in no way affects the responsibility of students who violate standards of conduct in courses and other academic activities.”

Protecting Your Health:

Diminished mental health, including significant stress, mood changes, excessive worry, or problems with eating and/or sleeping can interfere with optimal academic performance. The source of symptoms might be related to your course work; if so, please speak with me.  However, problems with relationships, family worries, loss, or a personal struggle or crisis can also contribute to decreased academic performance. Ithaca College provides cost-free mental health services through the Center for Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) to help you manage personal challenges that threaten your personal or academic well-being.

 

In the event I suspect you need additional support, expect that I will express to you my concerns and the reasons for them.  It is not my intent to know the details of what might be troubling you, but simply to let you know I am concerned and that help (e.g., CAPS, Health Center, Chaplains, etc.), if needed, is available. Remember, getting help is a smart and courageous thing to do -- for yourself and for your loved ones.

Attendance:

As per the Ithaca College Attendance Policy, students who miss class due to their religious beliefs or due to a verifiable family or individual health emergency will be excused. I reserve the right to request documentation of the reason for the absence. Please inform me as soon as possible if you must be absent from our class.

 

Course Schedule and Assignments

Week   1    August 27

Introduction to the course

History and debate over the social studies: "Why Should We Study the Social Studies?"

Student presentation: "Why Do I Want to Teach Social Studies?”

Educ: http://www.ithaca.edu/wise

http://www.edexcellence.net

Reflections on teacher role models. 

For next week prepare a current events/contemporary history lesson related to 9/11 to teach on our class next week that falls on 9/11.  Please refer to the lesson plan format found above

Review next week’s websites.

Read Stearns Chapters 8, 9, 10 and Kottler, Galavan Chapter 1        

 

Week   2    Sept. 8

Planning in the core subject fields of the social studies: History, Government, Geography and other related academic disciplines and creating communities of learners.  NCSS Thematic and Disciplinary Standards (find links above in section 3 of the Course Requirements)

First candidate teaching exercise – a topic related to 9/11

News: http://www.nytimes.com               

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/ and http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/

http://www.pbs.org http://www.pbs.org/topics/history/  http://www.pbs.org/topics/news-politics/

Gov.: http://thomas.loc.gov/ and http://loc.gov

http://civnet.org

History:

http://teachinghistory.org

http://www.besthistorysites.net

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/modsbook.html 

http://vlib.iue.it/history/index.html

http://worldhistoryconnected.org

http://www.rulers.org

http://www.historymatters.gmu.edu

http://womeninworldhistory.com

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/

http://www.einaudi.cornell.edu (outreach) http://einaudi.cornell.edu/outreach

For discussion – Stearns, et. al. Knowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 8, 9, 10.

 

Week   3.     Sept. 15

An Introduction to the Middle School and Grades 7-8 Social Studies.  Content planning in history and the social sciences within the middle school social studies curriculum

Diversity of historical approaches and an evaluation of social studies websites discussion

New York State Social Studies Standards

https://www.engageny.org/resource/new-york-state-k-12-social-studies-framework   http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/home.html  

National Council for the Social Studies and National Standards

http://www.socialstudies.org   

http://www.socialstudies.org/standards/strands

New York State Council for the Social Studies   

http://www.nyscss.org

Middle States Council for the Social Studies

http://mscfss.weebly.com/

National Center for History in the Schools

http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/nchs

NEH    

http://edsitement.neh.gov

Field Experience

An introduction to Middle School social studies – We meet at Boynton Middle School at 1:30 pm!

Apply the Galavan Chapter 1 reading to our Boynton field experience

For discussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 11 and 18

Read for next week – Knowing Teaching, Chapter 6, Loewen, Chapter 3, Kottler and Galavan, Chapter 2

 

Week   4.     Sept. 22

A review and evaluation of the New York State Curriculum in United States History and Government and relevant NCSS thematic and disciplinary strands and standards

Workshop – the social studies classroom – planning, organization and creativity

Selection of United States unit topic and format

 

Incorporating resources to make social studies real

Identifying and developing instructional goals, objectives and assessment strategies for lesson and unit plan development and implementation. 

DiscussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapter 6

Loewen, Teaching What Really Happened, Introduction and Chapter 3

Kottler, Chapter 2

Content and Application Plan on Current Events is due!             

 

Week   5.     Sept 29

Workshop - curriculum mapping, literacy, lesson and unit planning, Ithaca City School District High School Social Studies Department

Literacy strategies in the social studies and formal and informal methods of assessing student learning 

Discussion and application of behavioral objectives and critical thinking development in a social studies/historical context

Develop literacy to build social studies skills

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapter 6

Meeting with Ithaca High School Principal, Jarett Powers – IC Alumni Mentor and/or members of the social studies department

An introduction to the New York State Regents Examination

Organizational Development: Connections and Meeting the Standards

The American Historical Association

http://www.historians.org

C-SPAN

http://americanpresidents.org

New York State Regents exams

http://regentsprep.org

Review strategies

http://www.studystack.com http://www.studystack.com/History

Field Experience

We meet at Ithaca High School at 1:30 pm!

 

Week   6.     Oct. 6

Student teaching exercise in US History and discussion of units

The United States History Unit Plan is due this week!

Creating a history timeline

Timelines

 

http://cybraryman.com/timelines.html

http://thwt.org/index.php/presentations-multimedia/timelines

Online History Games

http://thwt.org/multimedia/games/

The Historical Text Archive

http://historicaltextarchive.com

The National Archives

http://www.nationalarchives.com

Subscribe to the H-Net Listserve edited for Social Studies Teacher Education Professionals:

http://www.h-net.msu.edu/~highs/                            

DiscussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapter 15

 

Week   7.     Oct. 13

Field Experience at the Frederick Douglas Academy in Harlem 

This will include a lesson plan assignment

 

Week   8.     Oct. 20

Literacy – http://www.readingquest.org/strat

Applied literacy strategies in the social studies classroom

Literacy and writing in the social studies curriculum; lesson adaptations for struggling readers and writers

Motivating student learning and literacy through clear, interactive and innovative social studies lessons and activities

Discussion of Kottler and Gallavan, Chapters 5, 6, 7

Curriculum development in Global History: a review of themes and sources.

New York Social Studies Curriculum in Global History and related NCSS Strands

Creating a Global History narrative

Selection of Global History topic

DiscussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 7, 20, 21

We will meet at Cornell University to become acquainted with Einaudi Center International Studies outreach materials for high school social studies classes

 

Week   9.     Oct. 27

Schools in rural communities: Planning, assessment and collaboration between faculty, administrators and community

Field Experience

We meet at Newark Valley School at 1:00 pm with Superintendent Ryan Dougherty, IC Alumni Mentor or Spencer Van-Etten High School with Social Studies Chair Andy McGee, IC Alumni Mentor

 

Week   10.  Nov. 3

Alternative Education Models and Media Impact on Student Learning of Social Studies –

Technology Infusion and Innovation into the Social Studies Classroom – Prof. Dennis Charsky, IC Alumni Mentor

Melissa Seidemann – IC Mentor conversation through Skype

http://www.h-net.org/~edweb/

Progress reports on the Global History Unit.

Integrating technology to enrich learning

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapter 10

http://www.projectlooksharp.org

 

Week   11.   Nov. 10

Discussion and evaluation of the second Unit Plan in Global History and the New York State

Standards: Themes and Resources. 

An integrated and comparative world historical approach

Powerful activities to engage learners

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapter 11

Journal Reports on meetings with mentor teachers

Global:

http://www.plattsburgh.edu/legacy

http://www.un.org

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/

http://memory.loc.gov

The Global History unit plan is Due Dec. 2. Student Teaching Exercise in Global History

Field Experience

We meet at Ithaca High School 1:30 pm.

 

Week   12.  Nov. 17

Global History unit plan update

Assessment of Student Learning

Student centered learning in planning and assessment

Community Resources -

Aging studies in the social studies: Intergenerational Collaboration and Older Adults as Sources of History.

Public and Local History – The History Center of Tompkins County

Curriculum Development in Economics Learning Standards Center for Economic Education at Ithaca College

http://www.ithaca.edu/stcee  

http://www.ithaca.edu/aging/schools  

http://www.thehistorycenter.net

For discussion – Knowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapter 14

Kottler and Galavan, Chapter 4

 

THANKSGIVING BREAK – NOV 24

Competing World Views in the Social Studies Classroom – Finish reading and prepare for a discussion of the Loewen and D’Souza books. The Comparative Book Critique is due Dec. 3

 

Week   13.   December 1

Instructional Assessment Strategies in the Social Studies: Essays, Objective Question and the N.Y. State Regents Examinations.

 

DBQs - Document Based Questions and the Use of Primary Sources.

Document Based Assessment Activities for US History

Document Based Assessment for Global History

Regents Exam Prep Center: http://regentsprep.org

For discussion – Knowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 9 and 22

                       

Week   14.    Dec. 8

Alumni Networking Project – summary, results and next steps

Professional collaboration, communication and networking

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapters 8 and 12

The Social Studies Teaching Profession: Past, Present and Future.    

Final Revisions of Unit Plans are due!  

Teaching lessons with your mentor teachers.

 

Week   15.    

EXAMINATION WEEK

Field Experience – visit Lehman Alternative Community School and Media Literacy, Project LookSharp: interpreting varied media in the 7-12 social studies classroom, Chris Sperry, IC Alumni Mentor

 

Teaching lessons with your mentor social studies teachers.

The Final Portfolio is due December

 

         

 

 

Scoring Rubric for NCSS Standards within Unit Plan

 

NCSS Standards

3 points

2 points

1 point

0 points

1.1 Culture and Cultural Diversity. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of anthropology and history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.2 Time, Continuity, and Change. Be familiar with the history of the United States, western civilization, and non-western society

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.3 People, Places, and Environments. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of geography

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.4 Individual Development and Identity. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of psychology

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.5 Individuals, Groups, and Institutions. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of sociology and history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.6 Power, Authority, and Governance. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of political science and history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.7 Production, Distribution, and Consumption. Understand the basic concepts of micro- and macro-economics

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.8 Science, Technology, and Society. Understand the manner by which science and technology have enhanced or threatened the development of human society in history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.9 Global Connections. Understand that our planet has been exposed to an ever-increasing human interdependence in a world made smaller by improvements in communication, transportation, and trade throughout history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.10 Civic Ideals and Practices. Understand the basic concepts of citizenship in a democratic society today and throughout history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

 

               

 

 

                Scoring Rubric for Unit Plan

NCSS

NYSED

Indicator

3 Points

2 Points

1 Point

0 Points

 

 

 

Context

 

A description of the context includes in-depth information about the school, community, classroom, and students for whom the unit has been designed.  This contextual information is considered in terms of its implications for planning.

 

A description of the context includes information about the school, classroom, and students for whom the unit has been designed.

 

Some contextual information is included but not enough to help guide the development of appropriate plans.

 

A description of the context is not provided.

 

 

3.1

 

Rationale

 

A clear, thoughtful, well-written rationale establishes the importance of and reasons for teaching this unit. The unit’s “big ideas” or essential questions are identified and discussed.  Theoretical perspective and/or research support is provided.

 

A clear, thoughtful, well-written rationale establishes the importance of and reasons for teaching this unit. The unit’s “big ideas” or essential questions are identified and discussed.

 

A rationale is included and describes the reasons for teaching this unit.

 

A rationale for including this unit in

the curriculum is not provided or is

vague and superficial.

All

NCSS

Standards

 

2.4

 

Standards

 

State, national, and/or common core standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

 

State, national, and/or common core standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards.

 

State, national, and/or common core standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

 

Standards are not included and/or

 lack congruence with unit rationale

 and goals.

 

 

2.4

 

Unit Goals

 

Clear, meaningful, challenging, multidisciplinary goals and/or themes are provided for the unit and are congruent with the unit rationale.  Essential knowledge/skills and enduring understandings are identified. 

 

Unit goals are congruent with the unit rationale and are clear, meaningful, and challenging.

 

Unit goals appear congruent with the unit rationale but are very general and unclear.

 

Unit goals are not included and/or

lack congruence with the unit rationale.

 

 

3.6, 5.1, 5.2

 

Assessments

 

Assessment plan includes a carefully-selected and sequenced set of multiple methods of both formative and summative assessment, with clear alignment to unit goals and a clear rationale for selection of assessments that are culturally sensitive and fair.

 

Assessment plan includes varied formative and summative assessments, aligned with unit goals and supported by a rationale for the selection of assessments that are culturally sensitive and fair.

 

Assessment plan includes formative and summative assessment but assessments are not clearly aligned with unit goals and/or the rationale provided for selection is not clear.

 

Assessment plan includes only

one method of assessment and/

lacks alignment with unit goals

or rationale and/or lacks a rationale

 for selection of assessments.

 

 

1.2, 1.6, 2.3, 3.1, 3.4

 

Literacy

 

State literacy standards are identified and congruent with the unit’s goals. Research-supported instructional practices in reading, writing, vocabulary, and oral language development are effectively integrated throughout the unit.  Plan shows respect for varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

 

 

State literacy standards are identified and addressed through the use of several approaches to literacy instruction and scaffolding in reading, writing, vocabulary, and/or oral language development.  Plan shows respect for varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

 

State literacy standards are identified as being addressed in the unit, but the integration of literacy instruction and scaffolding in the unit is not clear.

 

There is little or no evidence of

literacy being incorporated into the unit.

 

 

 

1.6, 3.4, 3.5

 

Technology

 

A range of media/technology is incorporated into the unit in carefully designed and innovative ways and is logically congruent with the unit goals, identified standards, and planned instruction.

 

 

Media/technology is integrated in a meaningful way into the larger instructional plan for the unit.

 

Media/technology is used in the unit, but its use is not clearly congruent with the unit.

 

There is no evidence of media/technology

being used in the unit or the media/tech

use is alluded to but not clear.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1

 

Weekly Plan

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, coherent weekly plan that contains varied, carefully-sequenced, innovative, developmentally-appropriate, culturally-responsive approaches to content-rich and multidisciplinary instruction. Multiple, logical forms of assessment are used.

 

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich weekly plan.  Lessons are varied and build logically upon one another.  A plan for assessment is included.

 

Weekly plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or coherence and/or weekly plan lacks a required component.

 

Weekly plan is missing required components

and/or is so general or disorganized that it is

difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #1

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #2

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #3

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #4

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #5

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

EDUC 50910: PEDAGOGY AND PRACTICE IN THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES

Fall 2014; 03 Credit Hours

Zenon V. Wasyliw                                                                              

Professor, Department of History and

Department of Education

Ithaca College

Muller 427 

wasyliw@ithaca.edu  274-1587 or 274-3303                                                            

http://faculty.ithaca.edu/wasyliw                                                            

Office Hours: Monday 12:00-1:00; Tuesday 4:00-5:00

Thursday 1:00-2:00

By appointment other days and times

I am often in my office additional times

Come in if you see my office door open

Class Meeting Time: Monday 1:00-3:50

Catalog Course Description:

Examination of current research and practice in the effective teaching of social studies at the middle and high school levels. Focus on national and state standards in social studies, mastery of theoretical concepts and their application in the classroom, instructional planning and differentiation, appropriate use of technology, approaches to assessment, and the integration of literacy in the social studies curriculum. Introduction to professional organizations, journals, and resources. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing or permission of instructor. 3 credits. (F, Y)

 

All-College Teacher Education Mission:

The All-College Teacher Education Unit at Ithaca College embraces the values of Knowledge, Competence, and Commitment to Service. Our mission is to prepare teachers who possess knowledge and teaching competence in their respective disciplines, who know how to work collaboratively and effectively with diverse communities of students and families, and who are inspired and motivated by the belief that excellence and equity in education are profoundly interdependent. To this end, Ithaca College teacher educators guide candidates through carefully designed and supervised programs where theory, research, and practice combine in order to provide them with solid foundations in the content, professional, pedagogical, technological, relational, and cultural knowledge and experiences needed in order to become engaged and effective teachers for all students in the 21st century.

 

The values and commitments found in the Unit’s Conceptual Framework are embedded in the following Ithaca College Teacher Education Program Standards. These eight Standards, when aligned with the New York State Teaching Standards and the Specialized Professional Association Standards, ensure that the All-College Teacher Education Unit’s goals of Knowledge, Competence, and Commitment to Service are attained. The Ithaca College Teacher Education Program Standards reflect the shared values and expectations of our teacher education faculty and stakeholders and are used to assess the readiness of every teacher education candidate at Ithaca College.

 

Ithaca College Teacher Education Professional Standards (IC TEPS)

Standard 1 - Content Knowledge: Ithaca College teaching professionals demonstrate a rich, thorough understanding of the content and skill knowledge, theories, and issues comprising their disciplines.

Standard 2 - Planning and Instruction/Implementation: Ithaca College teaching professionals are able to plan and implement effective, developmentally appropriate lessons and curricula based upon sound principles of content knowledge and skill development.

Standard 3 - Positive Learning Environment: Ithaca College teaching professionals create safe and motivational learning environments that encourage all students to become actively involved.

Standard 4 - Diversity: Ithaca College teaching professionals respect and possess knowledge of diversity in its many forms and know how to use this competence to develop relationships, instruction, schools, classrooms, communities and experiences that help all students achieve to their fullest potential and function effectively and respectfully in a diverse world.            

Standard 5 - Technology: Ithaca College teaching professionals are able to effectively utilize technology to enhance student learning and professional growth and development.

Standard 6 - Assessment: Ithaca College teaching professionals demonstrate the ability to develop and utilize a variety of assessment tools and techniques designed to evaluate student learning and performance, provide feedback, and shape future lesson planning, programs, and curricula.

Standard 7 - Collaboration and Outreach: Ithaca College teaching professionals foster positive relationships with a variety of target groups (e.g. students, families, colleagues, local community members, etc.) in order to promote and enhance the teaching and learning environment.

Standard 8 - Professional Development: Ithaca College teaching professionals engage in reflective practice and continually seek to improve their knowledge base and effectiveness as teachers, make positive contributions to the culture of their fields, and demonstrate the dispositions of an emerging professional.

 

Department of Education Mission:

Grounded in the rich traditions of the liberal arts and social sciences, and in keeping with the Ithaca College mission statement, the Department of Education prepares students to take responsibility for citizenship and service in the global community. This preparation takes place in several ways. The Department seeks to develop future teachers who are not only well-educated in their disciplines, but are also culturally responsive, caring, and knowledgeable in their interactions with students and their families. The Department also reaches out to the larger Ithaca College student body through courses and programs designed to equip them with the necessary skills for well-informed, critically reflective, participatory citizenship and service in their neighborhood schools and communities.  In addition, faculty and students in the Department of Education value, support, and engage in collaboration, discussion, and dialogue with a variety of local and regional community partners in order to be of assistance in addressing educational issues of concern and importance to them. In these ways, knowledge, competence, and service come together in our students to nurture a lifelong commitment to the democratic quest for excellence and equity in our schools and society.

 

Course Objectives, Goals and Purposes:

This course emphasizes teaching grades 7-12 social studies at the middle and secondary levels with special reference to the New York State Social Studies curriculum and the five Social Studies learning standards.  We also infuse the NCSS (National Council for the Social Studies) National Standards for Social Studies Teachers, aligning our program with NCATE (National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education) requirements.  This course examines and applies subject-specific methods and materials, including the assessment of student work, and teaching middle and secondary school students of varying needs, backgrounds, interests and levels of academic preparation.  Conceptualizing, organizing, presenting, and evaluating historical and social science content through curriculum development, instructional planning and strategies is particularly important.  This course introduces the practical application of history and each social science in relation to specific curricular demands through the framework of learning processes, motivation, communication and classroom management.  Instructional technology, literacy in the social studies, and the action research process are also integrated through a variety of applications. Mastery of both theoretical concepts and their application in the classroom is essential.  This class often meets in a public school setting with a significant field experience component

 

Required Readings:

D’Souza, Dinesh.  What’s So Great about America.

Loewen, James W. Teaching What Really Happened

Kottler, Ellen and Nancy P. Gallavan, Secrets to Success for Social Studies Teachers

Stearns, Peter, Peter Seixas and Sam Weinburg, Knowing Teaching and Learning History.

 

Grade Explanations:

A=       Clearly exceptional work for an undergraduate student. Outstanding, original, excellent.

B=       Above average work for an undergraduate student. Very good, consistently thoughtful,

            and analytical.

C=       Average work for an undergraduate student. Met minimum requirements, intermittently

thoughtful, insightful, and/or analytical. Satisfactory.

D=       See me immediately for individual help. Not acceptable work.

F=        See me immediately.  Failure to meet minimal expectations.

 

Grading for this course will be based on the following:

Two Social Studies unit plans, 25% each unit                                                  50%

Comparative book critique, Mentor teacher journal                                         20%

Graduate Project and three article evaluations                                                 15%

Participation, presentations, weekly journal, FDA                                           15%                                                                                                                                                    100%

 

Assignment Details:

1. Candidates must engage in quality discussions of assigned readings and must complete all written assignments.

2. Attendance is mandatory.  There are no un-excused absences.  “Students at Ithaca College are expected to attend all classes, and they are responsible for work missed during any absence from class.” Ithaca College Catalog, 2011-12).

http://www.ithaca.edu/provost/docs/apc/apcapprovepolicies/AttendancePolicy.pdf

3. Candidates complete two unit plans, one in United States history and one in global history both directly related to the spring student teaching assignment.  The units must include detailed innovative lesson plans with evidence of strong content mastery, infused with instructional technology and support for adolescent literacy and varied assessment strategies for diverse learners. 

Candidates will identify, assess and apply the ten thematic NCSS standards and the five New York State Social Studies Standards through the construction of curriculum units. 

http://downloads.ncss.org/NCSSTeacherStandardsVol1-rev2004.pdf

http://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/home.html

 

One-week Curriculum Unit in U.S. History and Civic Engagement/Government

Students are required to demonstrate content and pedagogical content knowledge related to NCSS standards 1.1 (Culture and Cultural Diversity) 1.2 (Time, Continuity and Change) 1.3 (People, Places and Environment) 1.5 (Individuals, Groups and Institutions) 1.6 (Power, Authority and Governance) 1.8 (Science, Technology and Society) 1.10 (Civic Ideas and Practices). New York State Standards in US History and Government are met.

 

One-week Curriculum Unit in Global History, Geography and Economics

Students are requires to demonstrate content and pedagogical content knowledge related to 1.1 (Culture and Cultural Diversity) 1.2 (Time, Continuity and Change) 1.3 (People, Places and Environment) 1.5 (Individuals, Groups and Institutions) 1.7 (Production, Distribution and Consumption) 1.9 (Global Connections). New York State Standards in Global History, Geography and Economics are met.

The Economics Standard and NCSS 1.7 can be alternatively assessed within the U.S. History Unit

Lesson Reflection

After the lesson has been taught, discuss any adaptations you made while teaching this lesson or plan to make if this lesson is repeated in the future. Explain why you made (or would make, in the future) these changes. How were these changes informed by your students’ learning?

 

Lesson Plan Format for Teacher Education Candidates

Ithaca  College School of Humanities and Sciences

Overview without Detailed Directions

 

file:///C:/Users/wasyliw/Downloads/Lesson%20Plan%20Overview%20HS%20062414.pdf

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plan Format for Teacher Education Candidates

Ithaca College School of Humanities and Sciences
 

Name

 

Lesson Title or Topic

 

Grade Level

 

Course Name or Content Area

 

 

Context

1. Explain the larger context in which this lesson fits.  For example, explain what larger unit would be going on at the time of this lesson and how this lesson fits into the unit. 

2. State the long-range learning objective/s to which this lesson contributes. The long-range objectives should deal with mastery of knowledge/skills that students will be able to transfer to real-life situations. 

3. Describe the students for whom this lesson has been developed.  Consider the personal, cultural, and community assets of your students.

 

Central Focus

Identify the central focus for the content/skill you will teach in this learning segment (a lesson or series of lessons). The central focus should address the important understandings and core concepts/skills you want student to develop in this lesson or series of lessons.

 

State/National Content Standards (Common Core State Standards)

List the number and full text of each standard that is addressed in this lesson.

Remember to include content and literacy standards, as appropriate to the lesson.

 

Objectives and Assessments

--Here list the short-range learning objectives specific to this particular learning segment.  These objectives should be items that are immediately observable and easily assessed.

--In addition, you will identify how you will know if the learning objectives have been met. List the types of assessments you will use to determine whether the objectives have been met. List the types of formative assessments you will use to monitor student learning of your short-range learning objectives for this lesson. What assessments will determine proficiency, excellence, or failure to meet the learning objectives?

--As you consider your assessments, you should think about the kind(s) of feedback your students will receive from you related to your assessments and how will you expect them to use this feedback.

Learning Objectives

The students will be able to …

 

 

 

 

 

Note: If you have more than 3 learning objectives, add a new row for each objective.

Formative Assessments

What evidence will you gather during the lesson to monitor whether your students are developing the understanding/skills required to meet the learning objective you have identified?

Note: Every objective should have a formative assessment.

Summative Assessments

What evidence, by the end of this learning segment, will show that students understand and have met your learning objectives?

 

Note: You might have duplicative assessments, or no summative assessments, for your learning objectives in this lesson.

1.

1.

1.

2.

2.

2.

3.

3.

3.

Prior Knowledge

What knowledge, skills, and concepts must students already know to be successful with this lesson?

How will you know if your students have prior knowledge, etc.?  Where will you teach/re-teach if necessary?

 

 

       

 

Academic Language

Academic language function

Choose one of these higher order language verbs (or another appropriate to your learning objectives): analyze, evaluate, explain, interpret, describe, predict, argue, or prove.  How will you help them do this verb (a.k.a academic language function) during or as a result of this lesson?  (Include how you will use students’ prior knowledge and your teaching in this lesson to facilitate and deepen student learning of this academic language skill.)

 

Language demands

What skill vocabulary (e.g., Venn diagram, graphic organizer, thesis statement) and content vocabulary (e.g., imperialism, mitosis) do students need to know in order to succeed?

Language supports

How will you help students understand the verbal and written language requirements to succeed in this lesson? (These should also be included in your step-by-step procedures below.)

 

 

 

Lesson Procedures: Instructional Strategies/ Learning Tasks

Describe, in detail, the steps you will follow in the lesson, attending to both what you will be doing and what the students will be doing. Boldface all procedures where you are monitoring student understanding using formative assessments.

Opening

How will you begin your lesson in a way that motivates and engages students in learning this lesson’s content? (Motivation for lessons should be interesting, age-level appropriate, brief, and directly related to the learning objectives of the lesson.)

1.

Step-by-Step Procedures

Time

List the next steps of your lesson. Provide detailed description of what teacher and students will be doing.  Boldface those procedures where teacher is monitoring student understanding during the lesson. (Your planned formative assessments from above should show up In this section as part of your lesson procedures.) Add rows below as needed.

Write lesson plan procedures so that another teacher could pick up your plans and actually accomplish your objectives for the class period.  (Hint: The following procedural terms are too vague: introduce, discuss, review.  How will you introduce something new?  How will you organize discussion, and what questions will you ask?  How will you conduct a review?) 

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

Closure

How will you bring this lesson to closure? How will students reflect on what they learned today, and how will you prepare them for what’s ahead?

6.

 

Differentiation

Universal Design

What general features of your procedures and/or assessment help support the learning of all students by making the lesson appropriate, feasible, and supportive for every student in the class?

 

Students with Specific Learning Needs (to be completed below)

What are some of the specific learning needs possessed by students in your class, and how do your plans intentionally support these students’ learning? Connect your support to the specific step-by-step procedures listed above (included the step number where you will adapt, if appropriate).

IEP/ 504 Plans (classifications/needs)

 

Supports, Accommodations, Modifications, Pertinent IEP Goals

 

 

Other Learning Needs

Examples: Struggling readers, English language learners, gifted students, etc.

Supports, Accommodations, Modifications

 

 

 

Instructional Resources/Materials

List here the resources you will use to engage students in learning.

Include handouts, slides, supplies, images, grouping plans, manipulatives, equipment, or anything else that requires advance preparation. Written materials should be attached to this plan.

 

 

Theoretical Principles/ Research-Based Practices

What research/theory supports your lesson design? Explain.

 

References

Include here (1) the specific references for the research and theory cited in the section above, and (2) any professional resources from which one or more parts of this plan have been borrowed/adapted. (If a mentor teacher shared plans, please credit him or her.)

 

 

Lesson Reflection

After the lesson has been taught, discuss any adaptations you made while teaching this lesson or plan to make if this lesson is repeated in the future. Explain why you made (or would make, in the future) these changes. How were these changes informed by your students’ learning?

 

 

 

 

**Designing a Unit Plan

Unit Plan Design: To maintain a consistent approach to lesson planning across all core education courses, the following components of a unit plan are required:Title of Unit: Create a title for your unit plan that makes clear its basic content.

Context: Indicate the subject/course, grade and level for which this unit has been developed. Include here information about (a) the contextual factors impacting the unit and (b) the intended learners for which this unit is planned.

Rationale: Explain the rationale for including this unit in the curriculum for this grade level. Why are you teaching this unit? What are the benefits for the students? 

State/National Standards Addressed: Specify which NCSS and New York state social studies standards are addressed in this unit plan.  Cite the standards by number, and provide a succinct description using the language of the standard.

Unit Goals: List the general overarching goal(s), theme(s), and/or essential questions for the unit as a whole.

Assessments: Provide an overview of the formative and summative assessments to be used in your unit. Include a culminating unit assessment that provides evidence of the effects of instruction on student learning. Explain your rationale for selecting/developing this particular approach to assessment for your unit. (Remember that your planned assessments should align with the standards and goals you have selected as being key to this unit.)  

Literacy: Identify the literacy objectives that will be taught as part of this unit.  Please reference the New York Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. Describe how you will integrate attention to these literacy objectives across your unit.  In what ways does your unit support the continuing literacy development of the students for whom you have planned this unit?  Consider the following: pre, during and post-reading activities; writing to learn across the curriculum; vocabulary development; oral language development; etc.

Technology: Describe the ways in which your unit incorporates the use of appropriate, effective technology to enhance student learning. 

Unit Plan Organization: The unit plan is comprised of a minimum number of lesson plans as specified by your instructor; for most courses a minimum of five lesson plans is required. Fill out a weekly content outline containing: learning objectives, assessments, basic procedures/activities, and any readings or homework for each day of the week (see next page for a basic structure for your content outline).

Lesson Plans: Each daily lesson plan in the unit must include:

  • all the components of a complete lesson as delineated in the Ithaca College “Designing a Lesson Plan” guidelines (see attached); each lesson plan must include differentiation.
  • all supplemental materials (e.g., PowerPoint slides, handouts, assessments with scoring guides). 

**Assessment rubrics are found at the end of the syllabus.

 

Each unit is selected in consultation with assigned mentors of the spring student teaching semester.  The ideal goal is to teach each unit during the spring student teaching professional semester. Mastery learning - students must make qualitative revisions of submitted units for inclusion in the final portfolio.

4. Candidates meet with and work closely with their assigned mentor teachers during this semester in preparation for their student teaching during the professional semester. Students observe their mentor teachers’ classes and co-teach several classes after close consultation.  A descriptive and reflective Mentor journal must be kept both chronicling and assessing this collaboration.  Students will share unit plans with mentors. Mentor collaborative field experience will total a minimum of ten hours.

5. Candidates must keep a weekly reflective journal summarizing and evaluating course assignments and activities. A class project will also involve developing a social studies teaching bulletin board on the fourth floor of Muller Faculty Center next to my office.

6. A comparative critique of the Loewen and D’Souza books.

7. Candidates will need to prepare and submit a formal lesson plan developed for and taught at FDA during Fall Break. More specific instructions will be shared prior to the FDA trip.

 

8. Candidates must submit a final portfolio containing two revised unit plans, mentor teacher journal, weekly reflective journal, evaluations of five most valuable websites, article evaluations and other required work.

9.  Article evaluation – Graduate level requirement of three articles from the Knowing Teaching and Learning History are to be carefully and critically evaluated in a four page analytical critique.

10.  Ithaca College and Local Social Studies Resources Project – Graduate level candidates will identify, in consultation with the instructor, Ithaca College and Ithaca area social studies related resources.  They will summarize and evaluate resource curricular connections to the National Council for the Social Studies Standards and New York State Social Studies Standards, identify useful connections to classroom teaching and assessment. The completed project will be published as an online resource link.  Resources include: Project Look Sharp, Aging in the Social Studies Curriculum, CSCRE, The Einaudi Center for International Studies at Cornell University, The History Center of Tompkins County and other potential resources.

11.  Graduate Action Research Based Project.  All candidates for the Master of Arts in Teaching are required to complete an action research based project that centers on significant practices in the content area.  This discipline-based project will be developed and researched in this course, implemented during the semester of student teaching, and assessed and critically reviewed in the seminar that accompanies student teaching and as part of the final portfolio.  This will be done in close collaboration with the Pedagogy and Practice across the Disciplines Seminar and the Director of Graduate Studies.  Graduate students will also serve as tutors with the Ithaca High School AVID program Advancement via Individual Determination also in collaboration with the Pedagogy and Practice across the Disciplines Seminar.

12.  Candidates are expected to become members of a professional Social Studies organization.  Membership in the New York State Council for the Social Studies (NYSCSS) is required http://www.nyscss.org/ and is only $15. Other optional memberships in the Middle States Council for the Social Studies, National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS), and the National Council for History Education (NCHE).

 

13.  The syllabus outline and assignments are subject to change.

 

14.  Alumni Networking Project.  We will work collaboratively with an existing list of connected alumni to determine possible online networking strategies to share information and offer advice.  The alumni are our social studies teaching and history graduates currently teaching or working in various education-related fields.  Our first Alumni-Mentor is Melissa Seideman and others will join us as the semester progresses. Candidates must register for her blog listed below.

We will be working with an Ithaca College Alumni-Mentor!

Melissa Seideman, a 2006 Social Studies Teacher Education graduate, has kindly agreed to serve as our first Pedagogy and Practice in the Teaching Social Studies Alumni Mentor.  We will add additional Alumni Mentors as the semester progresses.  Please follow Melissa’s instructions to subscribe to her blog and to follow the Monday evening Social Studies Twitter chat -

Blog: They can add it in Google Reader or subscribe to it (see steps 1 and 2) 

1. Go to http://notanotherhistoryteacher.edublogs.org/

2. Scroll down to "subscribe to this blog" and enter their email and click "subscribe"

Blog Contact: They can contact me via "comment" on any blog post and I will respond, send me a message in twitter, or click the "about me" page and click "contact me." I will respond either way! 

You need to stress Twitter. It has been the BEST forms of PD I have EVER found. 

--Tell them to add me on twitter and tweet me @mseideman 

-Every Monday Night 7-8 PM social studies teachers around the world follow #sschat Each week is a different question/prompt. After the chat I save so many useful websites, teaching handouts, lesson ideas that ACTUAL teachers have used. 

--Here is a post about  #sschat and the benefits of using twitter as a social studies teacher  http://www.sschat.org/

 

Additional Resources

New York State Social Studies Standards

https://www.engageny.org/resource/new-york-state-k-12-social-studies-framework  http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/home.html

National Council for the Social Studies and National Standards

http://www.socialstudies.org 

http://www.socialstudies.org/standards/strands  

National History Education

http://teachinghistory.org

World History Connected

http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/

National Center for History in the Schools

http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/nchs

Hacker/Fister, Documenting History Papers

http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/RES5e_ch10_s1-0001.html  

Social Studies History Teaching Resources

http://www.historyteacher.net

How to Write History Essays and do research

http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/index.htm

http://www.arts.cornell.edu/prh3/257/classmats/papertip.html

An essay writing guide from our Canadian friends -

http://www.historyandclassics.ualberta.ca/~/media/history/MainPage/GuideEssays.pdf

Literacy in Social Studies (includes very useful charts)

http://www.readingquest.org/strat

Media Literacy

http://www.projectlooksharp.org

 

Field Experience Record:

You will record our class field visits and most important your ten hours of field experiences with both assigned student teaching mentors (at least five hours with each mentor)

You should submit a record of your field experiences through Taskstream in the Teacher Education folio or online at http://tinyurl.com/ICfieldrecord.  You are responsible for submitting all of your field experience hours by deadline for this course. Answers to frequently asked questions are available in the Taskstream Teacher Education folio under the “Field Experience/Student Teaching Overview.”  If you have additional questions about how to submit hours, please contact the Field Experience Coordinator, Emily Hess, at ehess@ithaca.edu or 194 Phillips Hall Annex.

 

Student Disability Services:

In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, reasonable accommodation will be provided to students with documented disabilities on a case-by-case basis. Students must register with Student Disability Services and provide appropriate documentation to Ithaca College before any academic adjustment will be provided.

Statement on Academic Conduct:

The Ithaca College Policy Manual describes the Standards of Academic Content embedded in the Student Code of Conduct.  It is the responsibility of every student and faculty member to be familiar with, and comply with, these expectations for rigor, authenticity, trust, and honesty in academic work. You may find the full policy at the following web link:

http://www.ithaca.edu/policies/vol7/undergrad/070204/

As your instructor, I am responsible for reporting suspected academic dishonesty to the College, and students who are aware of—but do not report—academic dishonesty by others can be held responsible for failing to report it. We will discuss this policy more thoroughly in our course. As the Policy Manual states, “Because Ithaca College is an academic community, ignorance of the accepted standards of academic honesty in no way affects the responsibility of students who violate standards of conduct in courses and other academic activities.”

Protecting Your Health:

Diminished mental health, including significant stress, mood changes, excessive worry, or problems with eating and/or sleeping can interfere with optimal academic performance. The source of symptoms might be related to your course work; if so, please speak with me.  However, problems with relationships, family worries, loss, or a personal struggle or crisis can also contribute to decreased academic performance. Ithaca College provides cost-free mental health services through the Center for Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) to help you manage personal challenges that threaten your personal or academic well-being.

 

In the event I suspect you need additional support, expect that I will express to you my concerns and the reasons for them.  It is not my intent to know the details of what might be troubling you, but simply to let you know I am concerned and that help (e.g., CAPS, Health Center, Chaplains, etc.), if needed, is available. Remember, getting help is a smart and courageous thing to do -- for yourself and for your loved ones.

Attendance:

As per the Ithaca College Attendance Policy, students who miss class due to their religious beliefs or due to a verifiable family or individual health emergency will be excused. I reserve the right to request documentation of the reason for the absence. Please inform me as soon as possible if you must be absent from our class.

 

Course Schedule and Assignments

Week   1    August 27

Introduction to the course

History and debate over the social studies: "Why Should We Study the Social Studies?"

Student presentation: "Why Do I Want to Teach Social Studies?”

Educ: http://www.ithaca.edu/wise

http://www.edexcellence.net

Reflections on teacher role models. 

For next week prepare a current events/contemporary history lesson related to 9/11 to teach on our class next week that falls on 9/11.  Please refer to the lesson plan format found above

Review next week’s websites.

Read Stearns Chapters 8, 9, 10 and Kottler, Galavan Chapter 1        

 

Week   2    Sept. 8

Planning in the core subject fields of the social studies: History, Government, Geography and other related academic disciplines and creating communities of learners.  NCSS Thematic and Disciplinary Standards (find links above in section 3 of the Course Requirements)

First candidate teaching exercise – a topic related to 9/11

News: http://www.nytimes.com               

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/ and http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/

http://www.pbs.org http://www.pbs.org/topics/history/  http://www.pbs.org/topics/news-politics/

Gov.: http://thomas.loc.gov/ and http://loc.gov

http://civnet.org

History:

http://teachinghistory.org

http://www.besthistorysites.net

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/modsbook.html 

http://vlib.iue.it/history/index.html

http://worldhistoryconnected.org

http://www.rulers.org

http://www.historymatters.gmu.edu

http://womeninworldhistory.com

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/

http://www.einaudi.cornell.edu (outreach) http://einaudi.cornell.edu/outreach

For discussion – Stearns, et. al. Knowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 8, 9, 10.

 

Week   3.     Sept. 15

An Introduction to the Middle School and Grades 7-8 Social Studies.  Content planning in history and the social sciences within the middle school social studies curriculum

Diversity of historical approaches and an evaluation of social studies websites discussion

New York State Social Studies Standards

https://www.engageny.org/resource/new-york-state-k-12-social-studies-framework   http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/home.html  

National Council for the Social Studies and National Standards

http://www.socialstudies.org   

http://www.socialstudies.org/standards/strands

New York State Council for the Social Studies   

http://www.nyscss.org

Middle States Council for the Social Studies

http://mscfss.weebly.com/

National Center for History in the Schools

http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/nchs

NEH    

http://edsitement.neh.gov

Field Experience

An introduction to Middle School social studies – We meet at Boynton Middle School at 1:30 pm!

Apply the Galavan Chapter 1 reading to our Boynton field experience

For discussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 11 and 18

Read for next week – Knowing Teaching, Chapter 6, Loewen, Chapter 3, Kottler and Galavan, Chapter 2

 

Week   4.     Sept. 22

A review and evaluation of the New York State Curriculum in United States History and Government and relevant NCSS thematic and disciplinary strands and standards

Workshop – the social studies classroom – planning, organization and creativity

Selection of United States unit topic and format

 

Incorporating resources to make social studies real

Identifying and developing instructional goals, objectives and assessment strategies for lesson and unit plan development and implementation. 

DiscussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapter 6

Loewen, Teaching What Really Happened, Introduction and Chapter 3

Kottler, Chapter 2

Content and Application Plan on Current Events is due!             

 

Week   5.     Sept 29

Workshop - curriculum mapping, literacy, lesson and unit planning, Ithaca City School District High School Social Studies Department

Literacy strategies in the social studies and formal and informal methods of assessing student learning 

Discussion and application of behavioral objectives and critical thinking development in a social studies/historical context

Develop literacy to build social studies skills

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapter 6

Meeting with Ithaca High School Principal, Jarett Powers – IC Alumni Mentor and/or members of the social studies department

An introduction to the New York State Regents Examination

Organizational Development: Connections and Meeting the Standards

The American Historical Association

http://www.historians.org

C-SPAN

http://americanpresidents.org

New York State Regents exams

http://regentsprep.org

Review strategies

http://www.studystack.com http://www.studystack.com/History

Field Experience

We meet at Ithaca High School at 1:30 pm!

 

Week   6.     Oct. 6

Student teaching exercise in US History and discussion of units

The United States History Unit Plan is due this week!

Creating a history timeline

Timelines

 

http://cybraryman.com/timelines.html

http://thwt.org/index.php/presentations-multimedia/timelines

Online History Games

http://thwt.org/multimedia/games/

The Historical Text Archive

http://historicaltextarchive.com

The National Archives

http://www.nationalarchives.com

Subscribe to the H-Net Listserve edited for Social Studies Teacher Education Professionals:

http://www.h-net.msu.edu/~highs/                            

DiscussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapter 15

 

Week   7.     Oct. 13

Field Experience at the Frederick Douglas Academy in Harlem 

This will include a lesson plan assignment

 

Week   8.     Oct. 20

Literacy – http://www.readingquest.org/strat

Applied literacy strategies in the social studies classroom

Literacy and writing in the social studies curriculum; lesson adaptations for struggling readers and writers

Motivating student learning and literacy through clear, interactive and innovative social studies lessons and activities

Discussion of Kottler and Gallavan, Chapters 5, 6, 7

Curriculum development in Global History: a review of themes and sources.

New York Social Studies Curriculum in Global History and related NCSS Strands

Creating a Global History narrative

Selection of Global History topic

DiscussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 7, 20, 21

We will meet at Cornell University to become acquainted with Einaudi Center International Studies outreach materials for high school social studies classes

 

Week   9.     Oct. 27

Schools in rural communities: Planning, assessment and collaboration between faculty, administrators and community

Field Experience

We meet at Newark Valley School at 1:00 pm with Superintendent Ryan Dougherty, IC Alumni Mentor or Spencer Van-Etten High School with Social Studies Chair Andy McGee, IC Alumni Mentor

 

Week   10.  Nov. 3

Alternative Education Models and Media Impact on Student Learning of Social Studies –

Technology Infusion and Innovation into the Social Studies Classroom – Prof. Dennis Charsky, IC Alumni Mentor

Melissa Seidemann – IC Mentor conversation through Skype

http://www.h-net.org/~edweb/

Progress reports on the Global History Unit.

Integrating technology to enrich learning

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapter 10

http://www.projectlooksharp.org

 

Week   11.   Nov. 10

Discussion and evaluation of the second Unit Plan in Global History and the New York State

Standards: Themes and Resources. 

An integrated and comparative world historical approach

Powerful activities to engage learners

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapter 11

Journal Reports on meetings with mentor teachers

Global:

http://www.plattsburgh.edu/legacy

http://www.un.org

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/

http://memory.loc.gov

The Global History unit plan is Due Dec. 2. Student Teaching Exercise in Global History

Field Experience

We meet at Ithaca High School 1:30 pm.

 

Week   12.  Nov. 17

Global History unit plan update

Assessment of Student Learning

Student centered learning in planning and assessment

Community Resources -

Aging studies in the social studies: Intergenerational Collaboration and Older Adults as Sources of History.

Public and Local History – The History Center of Tompkins County

Curriculum Development in Economics Learning Standards Center for Economic Education at Ithaca College

http://www.ithaca.edu/stcee  

http://www.ithaca.edu/aging/schools  

http://www.thehistorycenter.net

For discussion – Knowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapter 14

Kottler and Galavan, Chapter 4

 

THANKSGIVING BREAK – NOV 24

Competing World Views in the Social Studies Classroom – Finish reading and prepare for a discussion of the Loewen and D’Souza books. The Comparative Book Critique is due Dec. 3

 

Week   13.   December 1

Instructional Assessment Strategies in the Social Studies: Essays, Objective Question and the N.Y. State Regents Examinations.

 

DBQs - Document Based Questions and the Use of Primary Sources.

Document Based Assessment Activities for US History

Document Based Assessment for Global History

Regents Exam Prep Center: http://regentsprep.org

For discussion – Knowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 9 and 22

                       

Week   14.    Dec. 8

Alumni Networking Project – summary, results and next steps

Professional collaboration, communication and networking

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapters 8 and 12

The Social Studies Teaching Profession: Past, Present and Future.    

Final Revisions of Unit Plans are due!  

Teaching lessons with your mentor teachers.

 

Week   15.    

EXAMINATION WEEK

Field Experience – visit Lehman Alternative Community School and Media Literacy, Project LookSharp: interpreting varied media in the 7-12 social studies classroom, Chris Sperry, IC Alumni Mentor

 

Teaching lessons with your mentor social studies teachers.

The Final Portfolio is due December

 

         

 

 

Scoring Rubric for NCSS Standards within Unit Plan

 

NCSS Standards

3 points

2 points

1 point

0 points

1.1 Culture and Cultural Diversity. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of anthropology and history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.2 Time, Continuity, and Change. Be familiar with the history of the United States, western civilization, and non-western society

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.3 People, Places, and Environments. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of geography

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.4 Individual Development and Identity. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of psychology

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.5 Individuals, Groups, and Institutions. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of sociology and history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.6 Power, Authority, and Governance. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of political science and history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.7 Production, Distribution, and Consumption. Understand the basic concepts of micro- and macro-economics

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.8 Science, Technology, and Society. Understand the manner by which science and technology have enhanced or threatened the development of human society in history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.9 Global Connections. Understand that our planet has been exposed to an ever-increasing human interdependence in a world made smaller by improvements in communication, transportation, and trade throughout history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.10 Civic Ideals and Practices. Understand the basic concepts of citizenship in a democratic society today and throughout history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

 

               

 

 

                Scoring Rubric for Unit Plan

NCSS

NYSED

Indicator

3 Points

2 Points

1 Point

0 Points

 

 

 

Context

 

A description of the context includes in-depth information about the school, community, classroom, and students for whom the unit has been designed.  This contextual information is considered in terms of its implications for planning.

 

A description of the context includes information about the school, classroom, and students for whom the unit has been designed.

 

Some contextual information is included but not enough to help guide the development of appropriate plans.

 

A description of the context is not provided.

 

 

3.1

 

Rationale

 

A clear, thoughtful, well-written rationale establishes the importance of and reasons for teaching this unit. The unit’s “big ideas” or essential questions are identified and discussed.  Theoretical perspective and/or research support is provided.

 

A clear, thoughtful, well-written rationale establishes the importance of and reasons for teaching this unit. The unit’s “big ideas” or essential questions are identified and discussed.

 

A rationale is included and describes the reasons for teaching this unit.

 

A rationale for including this unit in

the curriculum is not provided or is

vague and superficial.

All

NCSS

Standards

 

2.4

 

Standards

 

State, national, and/or common core standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

 

State, national, and/or common core standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards.

 

State, national, and/or common core standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

 

Standards are not included and/or

 lack congruence with unit rationale

 and goals.

 

 

2.4

 

Unit Goals

 

Clear, meaningful, challenging, multidisciplinary goals and/or themes are provided for the unit and are congruent with the unit rationale.  Essential knowledge/skills and enduring understandings are identified. 

 

Unit goals are congruent with the unit rationale and are clear, meaningful, and challenging.

 

Unit goals appear congruent with the unit rationale but are very general and unclear.

 

Unit goals are not included and/or

lack congruence with the unit rationale.

 

 

3.6, 5.1, 5.2

 

Assessments

 

Assessment plan includes a carefully-selected and sequenced set of multiple methods of both formative and summative assessment, with clear alignment to unit goals and a clear rationale for selection of assessments that are culturally sensitive and fair.

 

Assessment plan includes varied formative and summative assessments, aligned with unit goals and supported by a rationale for the selection of assessments that are culturally sensitive and fair.

 

Assessment plan includes formative and summative assessment but assessments are not clearly aligned with unit goals and/or the rationale provided for selection is not clear.

 

Assessment plan includes only

one method of assessment and/

lacks alignment with unit goals

or rationale and/or lacks a rationale

 for selection of assessments.

 

 

1.2, 1.6, 2.3, 3.1, 3.4

 

Literacy

 

State literacy standards are identified and congruent with the unit’s goals. Research-supported instructional practices in reading, writing, vocabulary, and oral language development are effectively integrated throughout the unit.  Plan shows respect for varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

 

 

State literacy standards are identified and addressed through the use of several approaches to literacy instruction and scaffolding in reading, writing, vocabulary, and/or oral language development.  Plan shows respect for varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

 

State literacy standards are identified as being addressed in the unit, but the integration of literacy instruction and scaffolding in the unit is not clear.

 

There is little or no evidence of

literacy being incorporated into the unit.

 

 

 

1.6, 3.4, 3.5

 

Technology

 

A range of media/technology is incorporated into the unit in carefully designed and innovative ways and is logically congruent with the unit goals, identified standards, and planned instruction.

 

 

Media/technology is integrated in a meaningful way into the larger instructional plan for the unit.

 

Media/technology is used in the unit, but its use is not clearly congruent with the unit.

 

There is no evidence of media/technology

being used in the unit or the media/tech

use is alluded to but not clear.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1

 

Weekly Plan

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, coherent weekly plan that contains varied, carefully-sequenced, innovative, developmentally-appropriate, culturally-responsive approaches to content-rich and multidisciplinary instruction. Multiple, logical forms of assessment are used.

 

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich weekly plan.  Lessons are varied and build logically upon one another.  A plan for assessment is included.

 

Weekly plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or coherence and/or weekly plan lacks a required component.

 

Weekly plan is missing required components

and/or is so general or disorganized that it is

difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #1

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #2

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #3

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #4

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #5

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

EDUC 50910: PEDAGOGY AND PRACTICE IN THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES

Fall 2014; 03 Credit Hours

Zenon V. Wasyliw                                                                              

Professor, Department of History and

Department of Education

Ithaca College

Muller 427 http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/11.2/bolgatz.html

wasyliw@ithaca.edu  274-1587 or 274-3303                                                            

http://faculty.ithaca.edu/wasyliw                                                            

Office Hours: Monday 12:00-1:00; Tuesday 4:00-5:00

Thursday 1:00-2:00

By appointment other days and times

I am often in my office additional times

Come in if you see my office door open

Class Meeting Time: Monday 1:00-3:50

Catalog Course Description:

Examination of current research and practice in the effective teaching of social studies at the middle and high school levels. Focus on national and state standards in social studies, mastery of theoretical concepts and their application in the classroom, instructional planning and differentiation, appropriate use of technology, approaches to assessment, and the integration of literacy in the social studies curriculum. Introduction to professional organizations, journals, and resources. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing or permission of instructor. 3 credits. (F, Y)

 

All-College Teacher Education Mission:

The All-College Teacher Education Unit at Ithaca College embraces the values of Knowledge, Competence, and Commitment to Service. Our mission is to prepare teachers who possess knowledge and teaching competence in their respective disciplines, who know how to work collaboratively and effectively with diverse communities of students and families, and who are inspired and motivated by the belief that excellence and equity in education are profoundly interdependent. To this end, Ithaca College teacher educators guide candidates through carefully designed and supervised programs where theory, research, and practice combine in order to provide them with solid foundations in the content, professional, pedagogical, technological, relational, and cultural knowledge and experiences needed in order to become engaged and effective teachers for all students in the 21st century.

 

The values and commitments found in the Unit’s Conceptual Framework are embedded in the following Ithaca College Teacher Education Program Standards. These eight Standards, when aligned with the New York State Teaching Standards and the Specialized Professional Association Standards, ensure that the All-College Teacher Education Unit’s goals of Knowledge, Competence, and Commitment to Service are attained. The Ithaca College Teacher Education Program Standards reflect the shared values and expectations of our teacher education faculty and stakeholders and are used to assess the readiness of every teacher education candidate at Ithaca College.

 

Ithaca College Teacher Education Professional Standards (IC TEPS)

Standard 1 - Content Knowledge: Ithaca College teaching professionals demonstrate a rich, thorough understanding of the content and skill knowledge, theories, and issues comprising their disciplines.

Standard 2 - Planning and Instruction/Implementation: Ithaca College teaching professionals are able to plan and implement effective, developmentally appropriate lessons and curricula based upon sound principles of content knowledge and skill development.

Standard 3 - Positive Learning Environment: Ithaca College teaching professionals create safe and motivational learning environments that encourage all students to become actively involved.

Standard 4 - Diversity: Ithaca College teaching professionals respect and possess knowledge of diversity in its many forms and know how to use this competence to develop relationships, instruction, schools, classrooms, communities and experiences that help all students achieve to their fullest potential and function effectively and respectfully in a diverse world.            

Standard 5 - Technology: Ithaca College teaching professionals are able to effectively utilize technology to enhance student learning and professional growth and development.

Standard 6 - Assessment: Ithaca College teaching professionals demonstrate the ability to develop and utilize a variety of assessment tools and techniques designed to evaluate student learning and performance, provide feedback, and shape future lesson planning, programs, and curricula.

Standard 7 - Collaboration and Outreach: Ithaca College teaching professionals foster positive relationships with a variety of target groups (e.g. students, families, colleagues, local community members, etc.) in order to promote and enhance the teaching and learning environment.

Standard 8 - Professional Development: Ithaca College teaching professionals engage in reflective practice and continually seek to improve their knowledge base and effectiveness as teachers, make positive contributions to the culture of their fields, and demonstrate the dispositions of an emerging professional.

 

Department of Education Mission:

Grounded in the rich traditions of the liberal arts and social sciences, and in keeping with the Ithaca College mission statement, the Department of Education prepares students to take responsibility for citizenship and service in the global community. This preparation takes place in several ways. The Department seeks to develop future teachers who are not only well-educated in their disciplines, but are also culturally responsive, caring, and knowledgeable in their interactions with students and their families. The Department also reaches out to the larger Ithaca College student body through courses and programs designed to equip them with the necessary skills for well-informed, critically reflective, participatory citizenship and service in their neighborhood schools and communities.  In addition, faculty and students in the Department of Education value, support, and engage in collaboration, discussion, and dialogue with a variety of local and regional community partners in order to be of assistance in addressing educational issues of concern and importance to them. In these ways, knowledge, competence, and service come together in our students to nurture a lifelong commitment to the democratic quest for excellence and equity in our schools and society.

 

Course Objectives, Goals and Purposes:

This course emphasizes teaching grades 7-12 social studies at the middle and secondary levels with special reference to the New York State Social Studies curriculum and the five Social Studies learning standards.  We also infuse the NCSS (National Council for the Social Studies) National Standards for Social Studies Teachers, aligning our program with NCATE (National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education) requirements.  This course examines and applies subject-specific methods and materials, including the assessment of student work, and teaching middle and secondary school students of varying needs, backgrounds, interests and levels of academic preparation.  Conceptualizing, organizing, presenting, and evaluating historical and social science content through curriculum development, instructional planning and strategies is particularly important.  This course introduces the practical application of history and each social science in relation to specific curricular demands through the framework of learning processes, motivation, communication and classroom management.  Instructional technology, literacy in the social studies, and the action research process are also integrated through a variety of applications. Mastery of both theoretical concepts and their application in the classroom is essential.  This class often meets in a public school setting with a significant field experience component

 

Required Readings:

D’Souza, Dinesh.  What’s So Great about America.

Loewen, James W. Teaching What Really Happened

Kottler, Ellen and Nancy P. Gallavan, Secrets to Success for Social Studies Teachers

Stearns, Peter, Peter Seixas and Sam Weinburg, Knowing Teaching and Learning History.

 

Grade Explanations:

A=       Clearly exceptional work for an undergraduate student. Outstanding, original, excellent.

B=       Above average work for an undergraduate student. Very good, consistently thoughtful,

            and analytical.

C=       Average work for an undergraduate student. Met minimum requirements, intermittently

thoughtful, insightful, and/or analytical. Satisfactory.

D=       See me immediately for individual help. Not acceptable work.

F=        See me immediately.  Failure to meet minimal expectations.

 

Grading for this course will be based on the following:

Two Social Studies unit plans, 25% each unit                                                  50%

Comparative book critique, Mentor teacher journal                                         20%

Graduate Project and three article evaluations                                                 15%

Participation, presentations, weekly journal, FDA                                           15%                                                                                                                                                    100%

 

Assignment Details:

1. Candidates must engage in quality discussions of assigned readings and must complete all written assignments.

2. Attendance is mandatory.  There are no un-excused absences.  “Students at Ithaca College are expected to attend all classes, and they are responsible for work missed during any absence from class.” Ithaca College Catalog, 2011-12).

http://www.ithaca.edu/provost/docs/apc/apcapprovepolicies/AttendancePolicy.pdf

3. Candidates complete two unit plans, one in United States history and one in global history both directly related to the spring student teaching assignment.  The units must include detailed innovative lesson plans with evidence of strong content mastery, infused with instructional technology and support for adolescent literacy and varied assessment strategies for diverse learners. 

Candidates will identify, assess and apply the ten thematic NCSS standards and the five New York State Social Studies Standards through the construction of curriculum units. 

http://downloads.ncss.org/NCSSTeacherStandardsVol1-rev2004.pdf

http://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/home.html

 

One-week Curriculum Unit in U.S. History and Civic Engagement/Government

Students are required to demonstrate content and pedagogical content knowledge related to NCSS standards 1.1 (Culture and Cultural Diversity) 1.2 (Time, Continuity and Change) 1.3 (People, Places and Environment) 1.5 (Individuals, Groups and Institutions) 1.6 (Power, Authority and Governance) 1.8 (Science, Technology and Society) 1.10 (Civic Ideas and Practices). New York State Standards in US History and Government are met.

 

One-week Curriculum Unit in Global History, Geography and Economics

Students are requires to demonstrate content and pedagogical content knowledge related to 1.1 (Culture and Cultural Diversity) 1.2 (Time, Continuity and Change) 1.3 (People, Places and Environment) 1.5 (Individuals, Groups and Institutions) 1.7 (Production, Distribution and Consumption) 1.9 (Global Connections). New York State Standards in Global History, Geography and Economics are met.

The Economics Standard and NCSS 1.7 can be alternatively assessed within the U.S. History Unit

Lesson Reflection

After the lesson has been taught, discuss any adaptations you made while teaching this lesson or plan to make if this lesson is repeated in the future. Explain why you made (or would make, in the future) these changes. How were these changes informed by your students’ learning?

 

Lesson Plan Format for Teacher Education Candidates

Ithaca  College School of Humanities and Sciences

Overview without Detailed Directions

 

file:///C:/Users/wasyliw/Downloads/Lesson%20Plan%20Overview%20HS%20062414.pdf

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plan Format for Teacher Education Candidates

Ithaca College School of Humanities and Sciences
 

Name

 

Lesson Title or Topic

 

Grade Level

 

Course Name or Content Area

 

 

Context

1. Explain the larger context in which this lesson fits.  For example, explain what larger unit would be going on at the time of this lesson and how this lesson fits into the unit. 

2. State the long-range learning objective/s to which this lesson contributes. The long-range objectives should deal with mastery of knowledge/skills that students will be able to transfer to real-life situations. 

3. Describe the students for whom this lesson has been developed.  Consider the personal, cultural, and community assets of your students.

 

Central Focus

Identify the central focus for the content/skill you will teach in this learning segment (a lesson or series of lessons). The central focus should address the important understandings and core concepts/skills you want student to develop in this lesson or series of lessons.

 

State/National Content Standards (Common Core State Standards)

List the number and full text of each standard that is addressed in this lesson.

Remember to include content and literacy standards, as appropriate to the lesson.

 

Objectives and Assessments

--Here list the short-range learning objectives specific to this particular learning segment.  These objectives should be items that are immediately observable and easily assessed.

--In addition, you will identify how you will know if the learning objectives have been met. List the types of assessments you will use to determine whether the objectives have been met. List the types of formative assessments you will use to monitor student learning of your short-range learning objectives for this lesson. What assessments will determine proficiency, excellence, or failure to meet the learning objectives?

--As you consider your assessments, you should think about the kind(s) of feedback your students will receive from you related to your assessments and how will you expect them to use this feedback.

Learning Objectives

The students will be able to …

 

 

 

 

 

Note: If you have more than 3 learning objectives, add a new row for each objective.

Formative Assessments

What evidence will you gather during the lesson to monitor whether your students are developing the understanding/skills required to meet the learning objective you have identified?

Note: Every objective should have a formative assessment.

Summative Assessments

What evidence, by the end of this learning segment, will show that students understand and have met your learning objectives?

 

Note: You might have duplicative assessments, or no summative assessments, for your learning objectives in this lesson.

1.

1.

1.

2.

2.

2.

3.

3.

3.

Prior Knowledge

What knowledge, skills, and concepts must students already know to be successful with this lesson?

How will you know if your students have prior knowledge, etc.?  Where will you teach/re-teach if necessary?

 

 

       

 

Academic Language

Academic language function

Choose one of these higher order language verbs (or another appropriate to your learning objectives): analyze, evaluate, explain, interpret, describe, predict, argue, or prove.  How will you help them do this verb (a.k.a academic language function) during or as a result of this lesson?  (Include how you will use students’ prior knowledge and your teaching in this lesson to facilitate and deepen student learning of this academic language skill.)

 

Language demands

What skill vocabulary (e.g., Venn diagram, graphic organizer, thesis statement) and content vocabulary (e.g., imperialism, mitosis) do students need to know in order to succeed?

Language supports

How will you help students understand the verbal and written language requirements to succeed in this lesson? (These should also be included in your step-by-step procedures below.)

 

 

 

Lesson Procedures: Instructional Strategies/ Learning Tasks

Describe, in detail, the steps you will follow in the lesson, attending to both what you will be doing and what the students will be doing. Boldface all procedures where you are monitoring student understanding using formative assessments.

Opening

How will you begin your lesson in a way that motivates and engages students in learning this lesson’s content? (Motivation for lessons should be interesting, age-level appropriate, brief, and directly related to the learning objectives of the lesson.)

1.

Step-by-Step Procedures

Time

List the next steps of your lesson. Provide detailed description of what teacher and students will be doing.  Boldface those procedures where teacher is monitoring student understanding during the lesson. (Your planned formative assessments from above should show up In this section as part of your lesson procedures.) Add rows below as needed.

Write lesson plan procedures so that another teacher could pick up your plans and actually accomplish your objectives for the class period.  (Hint: The following procedural terms are too vague: introduce, discuss, review.  How will you introduce something new?  How will you organize discussion, and what questions will you ask?  How will you conduct a review?) 

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

Closure

How will you bring this lesson to closure? How will students reflect on what they learned today, and how will you prepare them for what’s ahead?

6.

 

Differentiation

Universal Design

What general features of your procedures and/or assessment help support the learning of all students by making the lesson appropriate, feasible, and supportive for every student in the class?

 

Students with Specific Learning Needs (to be completed below)

What are some of the specific learning needs possessed by students in your class, and how do your plans intentionally support these students’ learning? Connect your support to the specific step-by-step procedures listed above (included the step number where you will adapt, if appropriate).

IEP/ 504 Plans (classifications/needs)

 

Supports, Accommodations, Modifications, Pertinent IEP Goals

 

 

Other Learning Needs

Examples: Struggling readers, English language learners, gifted students, etc.

Supports, Accommodations, Modifications

 

 

 

Instructional Resources/Materials

List here the resources you will use to engage students in learning.

Include handouts, slides, supplies, images, grouping plans, manipulatives, equipment, or anything else that requires advance preparation. Written materials should be attached to this plan.

 

 

Theoretical Principles/ Research-Based Practices

What research/theory supports your lesson design? Explain.

 

References

Include here (1) the specific references for the research and theory cited in the section above, and (2) any professional resources from which one or more parts of this plan have been borrowed/adapted. (If a mentor teacher shared plans, please credit him or her.)

 

 

Lesson Reflection

After the lesson has been taught, discuss any adaptations you made while teaching this lesson or plan to make if this lesson is repeated in the future. Explain why you made (or would make, in the future) these changes. How were these changes informed by your students’ learning?

 

 

 

 

**Designing a Unit Plan

Unit Plan Design: To maintain a consistent approach to lesson planning across all core education courses, the following components of a unit plan are required:Title of Unit: Create a title for your unit plan that makes clear its basic content.

Context: Indicate the subject/course, grade and level for which this unit has been developed. Include here information about (a) the contextual factors impacting the unit and (b) the intended learners for which this unit is planned.

Rationale: Explain the rationale for including this unit in the curriculum for this grade level. Why are you teaching this unit? What are the benefits for the students? 

State/National Standards Addressed: Specify which NCSS and New York state social studies standards are addressed in this unit plan.  Cite the standards by number, and provide a succinct description using the language of the standard.

Unit Goals: List the general overarching goal(s), theme(s), and/or essential questions for the unit as a whole.

Assessments: Provide an overview of the formative and summative assessments to be used in your unit. Include a culminating unit assessment that provides evidence of the effects of instruction on student learning. Explain your rationale for selecting/developing this particular approach to assessment for your unit. (Remember that your planned assessments should align with the standards and goals you have selected as being key to this unit.)  

Literacy: Identify the literacy objectives that will be taught as part of this unit.  Please reference the New York Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. Describe how you will integrate attention to these literacy objectives across your unit.  In what ways does your unit support the continuing literacy development of the students for whom you have planned this unit?  Consider the following: pre, during and post-reading activities; writing to learn across the curriculum; vocabulary development; oral language development; etc.

Technology: Describe the ways in which your unit incorporates the use of appropriate, effective technology to enhance student learning. 

Unit Plan Organization: The unit plan is comprised of a minimum number of lesson plans as specified by your instructor; for most courses a minimum of five lesson plans is required. Fill out a weekly content outline containing: learning objectives, assessments, basic procedures/activities, and any readings or homework for each day of the week (see next page for a basic structure for your content outline).

Lesson Plans: Each daily lesson plan in the unit must include:

  • all the components of a complete lesson as delineated in the Ithaca College “Designing a Lesson Plan” guidelines (see attached); each lesson plan must include differentiation.
  • all supplemental materials (e.g., PowerPoint slides, handouts, assessments with scoring guides). 

**Assessment rubrics are found at the end of the syllabus.

 

Each unit is selected in consultation with assigned mentors of the spring student teaching semester.  The ideal goal is to teach each unit during the spring student teaching professional semester. Mastery learning - students must make qualitative revisions of submitted units for inclusion in the final portfolio.

4. Candidates meet with and work closely with their assigned mentor teachers during this semester in preparation for their student teaching during the professional semester. Students observe their mentor teachers’ classes and co-teach several classes after close consultation.  A descriptive and reflective Mentor journal must be kept both chronicling and assessing this collaboration.  Students will share unit plans with mentors. Mentor collaborative field experience will total a minimum of ten hours.

5. Candidates must keep a weekly reflective journal summarizing and evaluating course assignments and activities. A class project will also involve developing a social studies teaching bulletin board on the fourth floor of Muller Faculty Center next to my office.

6. A comparative critique of the Loewen and D’Souza books.

7. Candidates will need to prepare and submit a formal lesson plan developed for and taught at FDA during Fall Break. More specific instructions will be shared prior to the FDA trip.

 

8. Candidates must submit a final portfolio containing two revised unit plans, mentor teacher journal, weekly reflective journal, evaluations of five most valuable websites, article evaluations and other required work.

9.  Article evaluation – Graduate level requirement of three articles from the Knowing Teaching and Learning History are to be carefully and critically evaluated in a four page analytical critique.

10.  Ithaca College and Local Social Studies Resources Project – Graduate level candidates will identify, in consultation with the instructor, Ithaca College and Ithaca area social studies related resources.  They will summarize and evaluate resource curricular connections to the National Council for the Social Studies Standards and New York State Social Studies Standards, identify useful connections to classroom teaching and assessment. The completed project will be published as an online resource link.  Resources include: Project Look Sharp, Aging in the Social Studies Curriculum, CSCRE, The Einaudi Center for International Studies at Cornell University, The History Center of Tompkins County and other potential resources.

11.  Graduate Action Research Based Project.  All candidates for the Master of Arts in Teaching are required to complete an action research based project that centers on significant practices in the content area.  This discipline-based project will be developed and researched in this course, implemented during the semester of student teaching, and assessed and critically reviewed in the seminar that accompanies student teaching and as part of the final portfolio.  This will be done in close collaboration with the Pedagogy and Practice across the Disciplines Seminar and the Director of Graduate Studies.  Graduate students will also serve as tutors with the Ithaca High School AVID program Advancement via Individual Determination also in collaboration with the Pedagogy and Practice across the Disciplines Seminar.

12.  Candidates are expected to become members of a professional Social Studies organization.  Membership in the New York State Council for the Social Studies (NYSCSS) is required http://www.nyscss.org/ and is only $15. Other optional memberships in the Middle States Council for the Social Studies, National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS), and the National Council for History Education (NCHE).

 

13.  The syllabus outline and assignments are subject to change.

 

14.  Alumni Networking Project.  We will work collaboratively with an existing list of connected alumni to determine possible online networking strategies to share information and offer advice.  The alumni are our social studies teaching and history graduates currently teaching or working in various education-related fields.  Our first Alumni-Mentor is Melissa Seideman and others will join us as the semester progresses. Candidates must register for her blog listed below.

We will be working with an Ithaca College Alumni-Mentor!

Melissa Seideman, a 2006 Social Studies Teacher Education graduate, has kindly agreed to serve as our first Pedagogy and Practice in the Teaching Social Studies Alumni Mentor.  We will add additional Alumni Mentors as the semester progresses.  Please follow Melissa’s instructions to subscribe to her blog and to follow the Monday evening Social Studies Twitter chat -

Blog: They can add it in Google Reader or subscribe to it (see steps 1 and 2) 

1. Go to http://notanotherhistoryteacher.edublogs.org/

2. Scroll down to "subscribe to this blog" and enter their email and click "subscribe"

Blog Contact: They can contact me via "comment" on any blog post and I will respond, send me a message in twitter, or click the "about me" page and click "contact me." I will respond either way! 

You need to stress Twitter. It has been the BEST forms of PD I have EVER found. 

--Tell them to add me on twitter and tweet me @mseideman 

-Every Monday Night 7-8 PM social studies teachers around the world follow #sschat Each week is a different question/prompt. After the chat I save so many useful websites, teaching handouts, lesson ideas that ACTUAL teachers have used. 

--Here is a post about  #sschat and the benefits of using twitter as a social studies teacher  http://www.sschat.org/

 

Additional Resources

New York State Social Studies Standards

https://www.engageny.org/resource/new-york-state-k-12-social-studies-framework  http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/home.html

National Council for the Social Studies and National Standards

http://www.socialstudies.org 

http://www.socialstudies.org/standards/strands  

National History Education

http://teachinghistory.org

World History Connected

http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/

National Center for History in the Schools

http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/nchs

Hacker/Fister, Documenting History Papers

http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/RES5e_ch10_s1-0001.html  

Social Studies History Teaching Resources

http://www.historyteacher.net

How to Write History Essays and do research

http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/index.htm

http://www.arts.cornell.edu/prh3/257/classmats/papertip.html

An essay writing guide from our Canadian friends -

http://www.historyandclassics.ualberta.ca/~/media/history/MainPage/GuideEssays.pdf

Literacy in Social Studies (includes very useful charts)

http://www.readingquest.org/strat

Media Literacy

http://www.projectlooksharp.org

 

Field Experience Record:

You will record our class field visits and most important your ten hours of field experiences with both assigned student teaching mentors (at least five hours with each mentor)

You should submit a record of your field experiences through Taskstream in the Teacher Education folio or online at http://tinyurl.com/ICfieldrecord.  You are responsible for submitting all of your field experience hours by deadline for this course. Answers to frequently asked questions are available in the Taskstream Teacher Education folio under the “Field Experience/Student Teaching Overview.”  If you have additional questions about how to submit hours, please contact the Field Experience Coordinator, Emily Hess, at ehess@ithaca.edu or 194 Phillips Hall Annex.

 

Student Disability Services:

In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, reasonable accommodation will be provided to students with documented disabilities on a case-by-case basis. Students must register with Student Disability Services and provide appropriate documentation to Ithaca College before any academic adjustment will be provided.

Statement on Academic Conduct:

The Ithaca College Policy Manual describes the Standards of Academic Content embedded in the Student Code of Conduct.  It is the responsibility of every student and faculty member to be familiar with, and comply with, these expectations for rigor, authenticity, trust, and honesty in academic work. You may find the full policy at the following web link:

http://www.ithaca.edu/policies/vol7/undergrad/070204/

As your instructor, I am responsible for reporting suspected academic dishonesty to the College, and students who are aware of—but do not report—academic dishonesty by others can be held responsible for failing to report it. We will discuss this policy more thoroughly in our course. As the Policy Manual states, “Because Ithaca College is an academic community, ignorance of the accepted standards of academic honesty in no way affects the responsibility of students who violate standards of conduct in courses and other academic activities.”

Protecting Your Health:

Diminished mental health, including significant stress, mood changes, excessive worry, or problems with eating and/or sleeping can interfere with optimal academic performance. The source of symptoms might be related to your course work; if so, please speak with me.  However, problems with relationships, family worries, loss, or a personal struggle or crisis can also contribute to decreased academic performance. Ithaca College provides cost-free mental health services through the Center for Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) to help you manage personal challenges that threaten your personal or academic well-being.

 

In the event I suspect you need additional support, expect that I will express to you my concerns and the reasons for them.  It is not my intent to know the details of what might be troubling you, but simply to let you know I am concerned and that help (e.g., CAPS, Health Center, Chaplains, etc.), if needed, is available. Remember, getting help is a smart and courageous thing to do -- for yourself and for your loved ones.

Attendance:

As per the Ithaca College Attendance Policy, students who miss class due to their religious beliefs or due to a verifiable family or individual health emergency will be excused. I reserve the right to request documentation of the reason for the absence. Please inform me as soon as possible if you must be absent from our class.

 

Course Schedule and Assignments

Week   1    August 27

Introduction to the course

History and debate over the social studies: "Why Should We Study the Social Studies?"

Student presentation: "Why Do I Want to Teach Social Studies?”

Educ: http://www.ithaca.edu/wise

http://www.edexcellence.net

Reflections on teacher role models. 

For next week prepare a current events/contemporary history lesson related to 9/11 to teach on our class next week that falls on 9/11.  Please refer to the lesson plan format found above

Review next week’s websites.

Read Stearns Chapters 8, 9, 10 and Kottler, Galavan Chapter 1        

 

Week   2    Sept. 8

Planning in the core subject fields of the social studies: History, Government, Geography and other related academic disciplines and creating communities of learners.  NCSS Thematic and Disciplinary Standards (find links above in section 3 of the Course Requirements)

First candidate teaching exercise – a topic related to 9/11

News: http://www.nytimes.com               

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/ and http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/

http://www.pbs.org http://www.pbs.org/topics/history/  http://www.pbs.org/topics/news-politics/

Gov.: http://thomas.loc.gov/ and http://loc.gov

http://civnet.org

History:

http://teachinghistory.org

http://www.besthistorysites.net

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/modsbook.html 

http://vlib.iue.it/history/index.html

http://worldhistoryconnected.org

http://www.rulers.org

http://www.historymatters.gmu.edu

http://womeninworldhistory.com

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/

http://www.einaudi.cornell.edu (outreach) http://einaudi.cornell.edu/outreach

For discussion – Stearns, et. al. Knowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 8, 9, 10.

 

Week   3.     Sept. 15

An Introduction to the Middle School and Grades 7-8 Social Studies.  Content planning in history and the social sciences within the middle school social studies curriculum

Diversity of historical approaches and an evaluation of social studies websites discussion

New York State Social Studies Standards

https://www.engageny.org/resource/new-york-state-k-12-social-studies-framework   http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/home.html  

National Council for the Social Studies and National Standards

http://www.socialstudies.org   

http://www.socialstudies.org/standards/strands

New York State Council for the Social Studies   

http://www.nyscss.org

Middle States Council for the Social Studies

http://mscfss.weebly.com/

National Center for History in the Schools

http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/nchs

NEH    

http://edsitement.neh.gov

Field Experience

An introduction to Middle School social studies – We meet at Boynton Middle School at 1:30 pm!

Apply the Galavan Chapter 1 reading to our Boynton field experience

For discussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 11 and 18

Read for next week – Knowing Teaching, Chapter 6, Loewen, Chapter 3, Kottler and Galavan, Chapter 2

 

Week   4.     Sept. 22

A review and evaluation of the New York State Curriculum in United States History and Government and relevant NCSS thematic and disciplinary strands and standards

Workshop – the social studies classroom – planning, organization and creativity

Selection of United States unit topic and format

 

Incorporating resources to make social studies real

Identifying and developing instructional goals, objectives and assessment strategies for lesson and unit plan development and implementation. 

DiscussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapter 6

Loewen, Teaching What Really Happened, Introduction and Chapter 3

Kottler, Chapter 2

Content and Application Plan on Current Events is due!             

 

Week   5.     Sept 29

Workshop - curriculum mapping, literacy, lesson and unit planning, Ithaca City School District High School Social Studies Department

Literacy strategies in the social studies and formal and informal methods of assessing student learning 

Discussion and application of behavioral objectives and critical thinking development in a social studies/historical context

Develop literacy to build social studies skills

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapter 6

Meeting with Ithaca High School Principal, Jarett Powers – IC Alumni Mentor and/or members of the social studies department

An introduction to the New York State Regents Examination

Organizational Development: Connections and Meeting the Standards

The American Historical Association

http://www.historians.org

C-SPAN

http://americanpresidents.org

New York State Regents exams

http://regentsprep.org

Review strategies

http://www.studystack.com http://www.studystack.com/History

Field Experience

We meet at Ithaca High School at 1:30 pm!

 

Week   6.     Oct. 6

Student teaching exercise in US History and discussion of units

The United States History Unit Plan is due this week!

Creating a history timeline

Timelines

 

http://cybraryman.com/timelines.html

http://thwt.org/index.php/presentations-multimedia/timelines

Online History Games

http://thwt.org/multimedia/games/

The Historical Text Archive

http://historicaltextarchive.com

The National Archives

http://www.nationalarchives.com

Subscribe to the H-Net Listserve edited for Social Studies Teacher Education Professionals:

http://www.h-net.msu.edu/~highs/                            

DiscussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapter 15

 

Week   7.     Oct. 13

Field Experience at the Frederick Douglas Academy in Harlem 

This will include a lesson plan assignment

 

Week   8.     Oct. 20

Literacy – http://www.readingquest.org/strat

Applied literacy strategies in the social studies classroom

Literacy and writing in the social studies curriculum; lesson adaptations for struggling readers and writers

Motivating student learning and literacy through clear, interactive and innovative social studies lessons and activities

Discussion of Kottler and Gallavan, Chapters 5, 6, 7

Curriculum development in Global History: a review of themes and sources.

New York Social Studies Curriculum in Global History and related NCSS Strands

Creating a Global History narrative

Selection of Global History topic

DiscussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 7, 20, 21

We will meet at Cornell University to become acquainted with Einaudi Center International Studies outreach materials for high school social studies classes

 

Week   9.     Oct. 27

Schools in rural communities: Planning, assessment and collaboration between faculty, administrators and community

Field Experience

We meet at Newark Valley School at 1:00 pm with Superintendent Ryan Dougherty, IC Alumni Mentor or Spencer Van-Etten High School with Social Studies Chair Andy McGee, IC Alumni Mentor

 

Week   10.  Nov. 3

Alternative Education Models and Media Impact on Student Learning of Social Studies –

Technology Infusion and Innovation into the Social Studies Classroom – Prof. Dennis Charsky, IC Alumni Mentor

Melissa Seidemann – IC Mentor conversation through Skype

http://www.h-net.org/~edweb/

Progress reports on the Global History Unit.

Integrating technology to enrich learning

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapter 10

http://www.projectlooksharp.org

 

Week   11.   Nov. 10

Discussion and evaluation of the second Unit Plan in Global History and the New York State

Standards: Themes and Resources. 

An integrated and comparative world historical approach

Powerful activities to engage learners

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapter 11

Journal Reports on meetings with mentor teachers

Global:

http://www.plattsburgh.edu/legacy

http://www.un.org

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/

http://memory.loc.gov

The Global History unit plan is Due Dec. 2. Student Teaching Exercise in Global History

Field Experience

We meet at Ithaca High School 1:30 pm.

 

Week   12.  Nov. 17

Global History unit plan update

Assessment of Student Learning

Student centered learning in planning and assessment

Community Resources -

Aging studies in the social studies: Intergenerational Collaboration and Older Adults as Sources of History.

Public and Local History – The History Center of Tompkins County

Curriculum Development in Economics Learning Standards Center for Economic Education at Ithaca College

http://www.ithaca.edu/stcee  

http://www.ithaca.edu/aging/schools  

http://www.thehistorycenter.net

For discussion – Knowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapter 14

Kottler and Galavan, Chapter 4

 

THANKSGIVING BREAK – NOV 24

Competing World Views in the Social Studies Classroom – Finish reading and prepare for a discussion of the Loewen and D’Souza books. The Comparative Book Critique is due Dec. 3

 

Week   13.   December 1

Instructional Assessment Strategies in the Social Studies: Essays, Objective Question and the N.Y. State Regents Examinations.

 

DBQs - Document Based Questions and the Use of Primary Sources.

Document Based Assessment Activities for US History

Document Based Assessment for Global History

Regents Exam Prep Center: http://regentsprep.org

For discussion – Knowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 9 and 22

                       

Week   14.    Dec. 8

Alumni Networking Project – summary, results and next steps

Professional collaboration, communication and networking

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapters 8 and 12

The Social Studies Teaching Profession: Past, Present and Future.    

Final Revisions of Unit Plans are due!  

Teaching lessons with your mentor teachers.

 

Week   15.    

EXAMINATION WEEK

Field Experience – visit Lehman Alternative Community School and Media Literacy, Project LookSharp: interpreting varied media in the 7-12 social studies classroom, Chris Sperry, IC Alumni Mentor

 

Teaching lessons with your mentor social studies teachers.

The Final Portfolio is due December

 

         

 

 

Scoring Rubric for NCSS Standards within Unit Plan

 

NCSS Standards

3 points

2 points

1 point

0 points

1.1 Culture and Cultural Diversity. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of anthropology and history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.2 Time, Continuity, and Change. Be familiar with the history of the United States, western civilization, and non-western society

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.3 People, Places, and Environments. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of geography

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.4 Individual Development and Identity. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of psychology

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.5 Individuals, Groups, and Institutions. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of sociology and history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.6 Power, Authority, and Governance. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of political science and history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.7 Production, Distribution, and Consumption. Understand the basic concepts of micro- and macro-economics

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.8 Science, Technology, and Society. Understand the manner by which science and technology have enhanced or threatened the development of human society in history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.9 Global Connections. Understand that our planet has been exposed to an ever-increasing human interdependence in a world made smaller by improvements in communication, transportation, and trade throughout history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.10 Civic Ideals and Practices. Understand the basic concepts of citizenship in a democratic society today and throughout history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

 

               

 

 

                Scoring Rubric for Unit Plan

NCSS

NYSED

Indicator

3 Points

2 Points

1 Point

0 Points

 

 

 

Context

 

A description of the context includes in-depth information about the school, community, classroom, and students for whom the unit has been designed.  This contextual information is considered in terms of its implications for planning.

 

A description of the context includes information about the school, classroom, and students for whom the unit has been designed.

 

Some contextual information is included but not enough to help guide the development of appropriate plans.

 

A description of the context is not provided.

 

 

3.1

 

Rationale

 

A clear, thoughtful, well-written rationale establishes the importance of and reasons for teaching this unit. The unit’s “big ideas” or essential questions are identified and discussed.  Theoretical perspective and/or research support is provided.

 

A clear, thoughtful, well-written rationale establishes the importance of and reasons for teaching this unit. The unit’s “big ideas” or essential questions are identified and discussed.

 

A rationale is included and describes the reasons for teaching this unit.

 

A rationale for including this unit in

the curriculum is not provided or is

vague and superficial.

All

NCSS

Standards

 

2.4

 

Standards

 

State, national, and/or common core standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

 

State, national, and/or common core standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards.

 

State, national, and/or common core standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

 

Standards are not included and/or

 lack congruence with unit rationale

 and goals.

 

 

2.4

 

Unit Goals

 

Clear, meaningful, challenging, multidisciplinary goals and/or themes are provided for the unit and are congruent with the unit rationale.  Essential knowledge/skills and enduring understandings are identified. 

 

Unit goals are congruent with the unit rationale and are clear, meaningful, and challenging.

 

Unit goals appear congruent with the unit rationale but are very general and unclear.

 

Unit goals are not included and/or

lack congruence with the unit rationale.

 

 

3.6, 5.1, 5.2

 

Assessments

 

Assessment plan includes a carefully-selected and sequenced set of multiple methods of both formative and summative assessment, with clear alignment to unit goals and a clear rationale for selection of assessments that are culturally sensitive and fair.

 

Assessment plan includes varied formative and summative assessments, aligned with unit goals and supported by a rationale for the selection of assessments that are culturally sensitive and fair.

 

Assessment plan includes formative and summative assessment but assessments are not clearly aligned with unit goals and/or the rationale provided for selection is not clear.

 

Assessment plan includes only

one method of assessment and/

lacks alignment with unit goals

or rationale and/or lacks a rationale

 for selection of assessments.

 

 

1.2, 1.6, 2.3, 3.1, 3.4

 

Literacy

 

State literacy standards are identified and congruent with the unit’s goals. Research-supported instructional practices in reading, writing, vocabulary, and oral language development are effectively integrated throughout the unit.  Plan shows respect for varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

 

 

State literacy standards are identified and addressed through the use of several approaches to literacy instruction and scaffolding in reading, writing, vocabulary, and/or oral language development.  Plan shows respect for varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

 

State literacy standards are identified as being addressed in the unit, but the integration of literacy instruction and scaffolding in the unit is not clear.

 

There is little or no evidence of

literacy being incorporated into the unit.

 

 

 

1.6, 3.4, 3.5

 

Technology

 

A range of media/technology is incorporated into the unit in carefully designed and innovative ways and is logically congruent with the unit goals, identified standards, and planned instruction.

 

 

Media/technology is integrated in a meaningful way into the larger instructional plan for the unit.

 

Media/technology is used in the unit, but its use is not clearly congruent with the unit.

 

There is no evidence of media/technology

being used in the unit or the media/tech

use is alluded to but not clear.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1

 

Weekly Plan

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, coherent weekly plan that contains varied, carefully-sequenced, innovative, developmentally-appropriate, culturally-responsive approaches to content-rich and multidisciplinary instruction. Multiple, logical forms of assessment are used.

 

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich weekly plan.  Lessons are varied and build logically upon one another.  A plan for assessment is included.

 

Weekly plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or coherence and/or weekly plan lacks a required component.

 

Weekly plan is missing required components

and/or is so general or disorganized that it is

difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #1

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #2

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #3

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #4

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #5

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

EDUC 50910: PEDAGOGY AND PRACTICE IN THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES

Fall 2014; 03 Credit Hours

Zenon V. Wasyliw                                                                              

Professor, Department of History and

Department of Education

Ithaca College

Muller 427 http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/11.2/bolgatz.html

wasyliw@ithaca.edu  274-1587 or 274-3303                                                            

http://faculty.ithaca.edu/wasyliw                                                            

Office Hours: Monday 12:00-1:00; Tuesday 4:00-5:00

Thursday 1:00-2:00

By appointment other days and times

I am often in my office additional times

Come in if you see my office door open

Class Meeting Time: Monday 1:00-3:50

Catalog Course Description:

Examination of current research and practice in the effective teaching of social studies at the middle and high school levels. Focus on national and state standards in social studies, mastery of theoretical concepts and their application in the classroom, instructional planning and differentiation, appropriate use of technology, approaches to assessment, and the integration of literacy in the social studies curriculum. Introduction to professional organizations, journals, and resources. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing or permission of instructor. 3 credits. (F, Y)

 

All-College Teacher Education Mission:

The All-College Teacher Education Unit at Ithaca College embraces the values of Knowledge, Competence, and Commitment to Service. Our mission is to prepare teachers who possess knowledge and teaching competence in their respective disciplines, who know how to work collaboratively and effectively with diverse communities of students and families, and who are inspired and motivated by the belief that excellence and equity in education are profoundly interdependent. To this end, Ithaca College teacher educators guide candidates through carefully designed and supervised programs where theory, research, and practice combine in order to provide them with solid foundations in the content, professional, pedagogical, technological, relational, and cultural knowledge and experiences needed in order to become engaged and effective teachers for all students in the 21st century.

 

The values and commitments found in the Unit’s Conceptual Framework are embedded in the following Ithaca College Teacher Education Program Standards. These eight Standards, when aligned with the New York State Teaching Standards and the Specialized Professional Association Standards, ensure that the All-College Teacher Education Unit’s goals of Knowledge, Competence, and Commitment to Service are attained. The Ithaca College Teacher Education Program Standards reflect the shared values and expectations of our teacher education faculty and stakeholders and are used to assess the readiness of every teacher education candidate at Ithaca College.

 

Ithaca College Teacher Education Professional Standards (IC TEPS)

Standard 1 - Content Knowledge: Ithaca College teaching professionals demonstrate a rich, thorough understanding of the content and skill knowledge, theories, and issues comprising their disciplines.

Standard 2 - Planning and Instruction/Implementation: Ithaca College teaching professionals are able to plan and implement effective, developmentally appropriate lessons and curricula based upon sound principles of content knowledge and skill development.

Standard 3 - Positive Learning Environment: Ithaca College teaching professionals create safe and motivational learning environments that encourage all students to become actively involved.

Standard 4 - Diversity: Ithaca College teaching professionals respect and possess knowledge of diversity in its many forms and know how to use this competence to develop relationships, instruction, schools, classrooms, communities and experiences that help all students achieve to their fullest potential and function effectively and respectfully in a diverse world.            

Standard 5 - Technology: Ithaca College teaching professionals are able to effectively utilize technology to enhance student learning and professional growth and development.

Standard 6 - Assessment: Ithaca College teaching professionals demonstrate the ability to develop and utilize a variety of assessment tools and techniques designed to evaluate student learning and performance, provide feedback, and shape future lesson planning, programs, and curricula.

Standard 7 - Collaboration and Outreach: Ithaca College teaching professionals foster positive relationships with a variety of target groups (e.g. students, families, colleagues, local community members, etc.) in order to promote and enhance the teaching and learning environment.

Standard 8 - Professional Development: Ithaca College teaching professionals engage in reflective practice and continually seek to improve their knowledge base and effectiveness as teachers, make positive contributions to the culture of their fields, and demonstrate the dispositions of an emerging professional.

 

Department of Education Mission:

Grounded in the rich traditions of the liberal arts and social sciences, and in keeping with the Ithaca College mission statement, the Department of Education prepares students to take responsibility for citizenship and service in the global community. This preparation takes place in several ways. The Department seeks to develop future teachers who are not only well-educated in their disciplines, but are also culturally responsive, caring, and knowledgeable in their interactions with students and their families. The Department also reaches out to the larger Ithaca College student body through courses and programs designed to equip them with the necessary skills for well-informed, critically reflective, participatory citizenship and service in their neighborhood schools and communities.  In addition, faculty and students in the Department of Education value, support, and engage in collaboration, discussion, and dialogue with a variety of local and regional community partners in order to be of assistance in addressing educational issues of concern and importance to them. In these ways, knowledge, competence, and service come together in our students to nurture a lifelong commitment to the democratic quest for excellence and equity in our schools and society.

 

Course Objectives, Goals and Purposes:

This course emphasizes teaching grades 7-12 social studies at the middle and secondary levels with special reference to the New York State Social Studies curriculum and the five Social Studies learning standards.  We also infuse the NCSS (National Council for the Social Studies) National Standards for Social Studies Teachers, aligning our program with NCATE (National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education) requirements.  This course examines and applies subject-specific methods and materials, including the assessment of student work, and teaching middle and secondary school students of varying needs, backgrounds, interests and levels of academic preparation.  Conceptualizing, organizing, presenting, and evaluating historical and social science content through curriculum development, instructional planning and strategies is particularly important.  This course introduces the practical application of history and each social science in relation to specific curricular demands through the framework of learning processes, motivation, communication and classroom management.  Instructional technology, literacy in the social studies, and the action research process are also integrated through a variety of applications. Mastery of both theoretical concepts and their application in the classroom is essential.  This class often meets in a public school setting with a significant field experience component

 

Required Readings:

D’Souza, Dinesh.  What’s So Great about America.

Loewen, James W. Teaching What Really Happened

Kottler, Ellen and Nancy P. Gallavan, Secrets to Success for Social Studies Teachers

Stearns, Peter, Peter Seixas and Sam Weinburg, Knowing Teaching and Learning History.

 

Grade Explanations:

A=       Clearly exceptional work for an undergraduate student. Outstanding, original, excellent.

B=       Above average work for an undergraduate student. Very good, consistently thoughtful,

            and analytical.

C=       Average work for an undergraduate student. Met minimum requirements, intermittently

thoughtful, insightful, and/or analytical. Satisfactory.

D=       See me immediately for individual help. Not acceptable work.

F=        See me immediately.  Failure to meet minimal expectations.

 

Grading for this course will be based on the following:

Two Social Studies unit plans, 25% each unit                                                  50%

Comparative book critique, Mentor teacher journal                                         20%

Graduate Project and three article evaluations                                                 15%

Participation, presentations, weekly journal, FDA                                           15%                                                                                                                                                    100%

 

Assignment Details:

1. Candidates must engage in quality discussions of assigned readings and must complete all written assignments.

2. Attendance is mandatory.  There are no un-excused absences.  “Students at Ithaca College are expected to attend all classes, and they are responsible for work missed during any absence from class.” Ithaca College Catalog, 2011-12).

http://www.ithaca.edu/provost/docs/apc/apcapprovepolicies/AttendancePolicy.pdf

3. Candidates complete two unit plans, one in United States history and one in global history both directly related to the spring student teaching assignment.  The units must include detailed innovative lesson plans with evidence of strong content mastery, infused with instructional technology and support for adolescent literacy and varied assessment strategies for diverse learners. 

Candidates will identify, assess and apply the ten thematic NCSS standards and the five New York State Social Studies Standards through the construction of curriculum units. 

http://downloads.ncss.org/NCSSTeacherStandardsVol1-rev2004.pdf

http://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/home.html

 

One-week Curriculum Unit in U.S. History and Civic Engagement/Government

Students are required to demonstrate content and pedagogical content knowledge related to NCSS standards 1.1 (Culture and Cultural Diversity) 1.2 (Time, Continuity and Change) 1.3 (People, Places and Environment) 1.5 (Individuals, Groups and Institutions) 1.6 (Power, Authority and Governance) 1.8 (Science, Technology and Society) 1.10 (Civic Ideas and Practices). New York State Standards in US History and Government are met.

 

One-week Curriculum Unit in Global History, Geography and Economics

Students are requires to demonstrate content and pedagogical content knowledge related to 1.1 (Culture and Cultural Diversity) 1.2 (Time, Continuity and Change) 1.3 (People, Places and Environment) 1.5 (Individuals, Groups and Institutions) 1.7 (Production, Distribution and Consumption) 1.9 (Global Connections). New York State Standards in Global History, Geography and Economics are met.

The Economics Standard and NCSS 1.7 can be alternatively assessed within the U.S. History Unit

Lesson Reflection

After the lesson has been taught, discuss any adaptations you made while teaching this lesson or plan to make if this lesson is repeated in the future. Explain why you made (or would make, in the future) these changes. How were these changes informed by your students’ learning?

 

Lesson Plan Format for Teacher Education Candidates

Ithaca  College School of Humanities and Sciences

Overview without Detailed Directions

 

file:///C:/Users/wasyliw/Downloads/Lesson%20Plan%20Overview%20HS%20062414.pdf

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plan Format for Teacher Education Candidates

Ithaca College School of Humanities and Sciences
 

Name

 

Lesson Title or Topic

 

Grade Level

 

Course Name or Content Area

 

 

Context

1. Explain the larger context in which this lesson fits.  For example, explain what larger unit would be going on at the time of this lesson and how this lesson fits into the unit. 

2. State the long-range learning objective/s to which this lesson contributes. The long-range objectives should deal with mastery of knowledge/skills that students will be able to transfer to real-life situations. 

3. Describe the students for whom this lesson has been developed.  Consider the personal, cultural, and community assets of your students.

 

Central Focus

Identify the central focus for the content/skill you will teach in this learning segment (a lesson or series of lessons). The central focus should address the important understandings and core concepts/skills you want student to develop in this lesson or series of lessons.

 

State/National Content Standards (Common Core State Standards)

List the number and full text of each standard that is addressed in this lesson.

Remember to include content and literacy standards, as appropriate to the lesson.

 

Objectives and Assessments

--Here list the short-range learning objectives specific to this particular learning segment.  These objectives should be items that are immediately observable and easily assessed.

--In addition, you will identify how you will know if the learning objectives have been met. List the types of assessments you will use to determine whether the objectives have been met. List the types of formative assessments you will use to monitor student learning of your short-range learning objectives for this lesson. What assessments will determine proficiency, excellence, or failure to meet the learning objectives?

--As you consider your assessments, you should think about the kind(s) of feedback your students will receive from you related to your assessments and how will you expect them to use this feedback.

Learning Objectives

The students will be able to …

 

 

 

 

 

Note: If you have more than 3 learning objectives, add a new row for each objective.

Formative Assessments

What evidence will you gather during the lesson to monitor whether your students are developing the understanding/skills required to meet the learning objective you have identified?

Note: Every objective should have a formative assessment.

Summative Assessments

What evidence, by the end of this learning segment, will show that students understand and have met your learning objectives?

 

Note: You might have duplicative assessments, or no summative assessments, for your learning objectives in this lesson.

1.

1.

1.

2.

2.

2.

3.

3.

3.

Prior Knowledge

What knowledge, skills, and concepts must students already know to be successful with this lesson?

How will you know if your students have prior knowledge, etc.?  Where will you teach/re-teach if necessary?

 

 

       

 

Academic Language

Academic language function

Choose one of these higher order language verbs (or another appropriate to your learning objectives): analyze, evaluate, explain, interpret, describe, predict, argue, or prove.  How will you help them do this verb (a.k.a academic language function) during or as a result of this lesson?  (Include how you will use students’ prior knowledge and your teaching in this lesson to facilitate and deepen student learning of this academic language skill.)

 

Language demands

What skill vocabulary (e.g., Venn diagram, graphic organizer, thesis statement) and content vocabulary (e.g., imperialism, mitosis) do students need to know in order to succeed?

Language supports

How will you help students understand the verbal and written language requirements to succeed in this lesson? (These should also be included in your step-by-step procedures below.)

 

 

 

Lesson Procedures: Instructional Strategies/ Learning Tasks

Describe, in detail, the steps you will follow in the lesson, attending to both what you will be doing and what the students will be doing. Boldface all procedures where you are monitoring student understanding using formative assessments.

Opening

How will you begin your lesson in a way that motivates and engages students in learning this lesson’s content? (Motivation for lessons should be interesting, age-level appropriate, brief, and directly related to the learning objectives of the lesson.)

1.

Step-by-Step Procedures

Time

List the next steps of your lesson. Provide detailed description of what teacher and students will be doing.  Boldface those procedures where teacher is monitoring student understanding during the lesson. (Your planned formative assessments from above should show up In this section as part of your lesson procedures.) Add rows below as needed.

Write lesson plan procedures so that another teacher could pick up your plans and actually accomplish your objectives for the class period.  (Hint: The following procedural terms are too vague: introduce, discuss, review.  How will you introduce something new?  How will you organize discussion, and what questions will you ask?  How will you conduct a review?) 

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

Closure

How will you bring this lesson to closure? How will students reflect on what they learned today, and how will you prepare them for what’s ahead?

6.

 

Differentiation

Universal Design

What general features of your procedures and/or assessment help support the learning of all students by making the lesson appropriate, feasible, and supportive for every student in the class?

 

Students with Specific Learning Needs (to be completed below)

What are some of the specific learning needs possessed by students in your class, and how do your plans intentionally support these students’ learning? Connect your support to the specific step-by-step procedures listed above (included the step number where you will adapt, if appropriate).

IEP/ 504 Plans (classifications/needs)

 

Supports, Accommodations, Modifications, Pertinent IEP Goals

 

 

Other Learning Needs

Examples: Struggling readers, English language learners, gifted students, etc.

Supports, Accommodations, Modifications

 

 

 

Instructional Resources/Materials

List here the resources you will use to engage students in learning.

Include handouts, slides, supplies, images, grouping plans, manipulatives, equipment, or anything else that requires advance preparation. Written materials should be attached to this plan.

 

 

Theoretical Principles/ Research-Based Practices

What research/theory supports your lesson design? Explain.

 

References

Include here (1) the specific references for the research and theory cited in the section above, and (2) any professional resources from which one or more parts of this plan have been borrowed/adapted. (If a mentor teacher shared plans, please credit him or her.)

 

 

Lesson Reflection

After the lesson has been taught, discuss any adaptations you made while teaching this lesson or plan to make if this lesson is repeated in the future. Explain why you made (or would make, in the future) these changes. How were these changes informed by your students’ learning?

 

 

 

 

**Designing a Unit Plan

Unit Plan Design: To maintain a consistent approach to lesson planning across all core education courses, the following components of a unit plan are required:Title of Unit: Create a title for your unit plan that makes clear its basic content.

Context: Indicate the subject/course, grade and level for which this unit has been developed. Include here information about (a) the contextual factors impacting the unit and (b) the intended learners for which this unit is planned.

Rationale: Explain the rationale for including this unit in the curriculum for this grade level. Why are you teaching this unit? What are the benefits for the students? 

State/National Standards Addressed: Specify which NCSS and New York state social studies standards are addressed in this unit plan.  Cite the standards by number, and provide a succinct description using the language of the standard.

Unit Goals: List the general overarching goal(s), theme(s), and/or essential questions for the unit as a whole.

Assessments: Provide an overview of the formative and summative assessments to be used in your unit. Include a culminating unit assessment that provides evidence of the effects of instruction on student learning. Explain your rationale for selecting/developing this particular approach to assessment for your unit. (Remember that your planned assessments should align with the standards and goals you have selected as being key to this unit.)  

Literacy: Identify the literacy objectives that will be taught as part of this unit.  Please reference the New York Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. Describe how you will integrate attention to these literacy objectives across your unit.  In what ways does your unit support the continuing literacy development of the students for whom you have planned this unit?  Consider the following: pre, during and post-reading activities; writing to learn across the curriculum; vocabulary development; oral language development; etc.

Technology: Describe the ways in which your unit incorporates the use of appropriate, effective technology to enhance student learning. 

Unit Plan Organization: The unit plan is comprised of a minimum number of lesson plans as specified by your instructor; for most courses a minimum of five lesson plans is required. Fill out a weekly content outline containing: learning objectives, assessments, basic procedures/activities, and any readings or homework for each day of the week (see next page for a basic structure for your content outline).

Lesson Plans: Each daily lesson plan in the unit must include:

  • all the components of a complete lesson as delineated in the Ithaca College “Designing a Lesson Plan” guidelines (see attached); each lesson plan must include differentiation.
  • all supplemental materials (e.g., PowerPoint slides, handouts, assessments with scoring guides). 

**Assessment rubrics are found at the end of the syllabus.

 

Each unit is selected in consultation with assigned mentors of the spring student teaching semester.  The ideal goal is to teach each unit during the spring student teaching professional semester. Mastery learning - students must make qualitative revisions of submitted units for inclusion in the final portfolio.

4. Candidates meet with and work closely with their assigned mentor teachers during this semester in preparation for their student teaching during the professional semester. Students observe their mentor teachers’ classes and co-teach several classes after close consultation.  A descriptive and reflective Mentor journal must be kept both chronicling and assessing this collaboration.  Students will share unit plans with mentors. Mentor collaborative field experience will total a minimum of ten hours.

5. Candidates must keep a weekly reflective journal summarizing and evaluating course assignments and activities. A class project will also involve developing a social studies teaching bulletin board on the fourth floor of Muller Faculty Center next to my office.

6. A comparative critique of the Loewen and D’Souza books.

7. Candidates will need to prepare and submit a formal lesson plan developed for and taught at FDA during Fall Break. More specific instructions will be shared prior to the FDA trip.

 

8. Candidates must submit a final portfolio containing two revised unit plans, mentor teacher journal, weekly reflective journal, evaluations of five most valuable websites, article evaluations and other required work.

9.  Article evaluation – Graduate level requirement of three articles from the Knowing Teaching and Learning History are to be carefully and critically evaluated in a four page analytical critique.

10.  Ithaca College and Local Social Studies Resources Project – Graduate level candidates will identify, in consultation with the instructor, Ithaca College and Ithaca area social studies related resources.  They will summarize and evaluate resource curricular connections to the National Council for the Social Studies Standards and New York State Social Studies Standards, identify useful connections to classroom teaching and assessment. The completed project will be published as an online resource link.  Resources include: Project Look Sharp, Aging in the Social Studies Curriculum, CSCRE, The Einaudi Center for International Studies at Cornell University, The History Center of Tompkins County and other potential resources.

11.  Graduate Action Research Based Project.  All candidates for the Master of Arts in Teaching are required to complete an action research based project that centers on significant practices in the content area.  This discipline-based project will be developed and researched in this course, implemented during the semester of student teaching, and assessed and critically reviewed in the seminar that accompanies student teaching and as part of the final portfolio.  This will be done in close collaboration with the Pedagogy and Practice across the Disciplines Seminar and the Director of Graduate Studies.  Graduate students will also serve as tutors with the Ithaca High School AVID program Advancement via Individual Determination also in collaboration with the Pedagogy and Practice across the Disciplines Seminar.

12.  Candidates are expected to become members of a professional Social Studies organization.  Membership in the New York State Council for the Social Studies (NYSCSS) is required http://www.nyscss.org/ and is only $15. Other optional memberships in the Middle States Council for the Social Studies, National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS), and the National Council for History Education (NCHE).

 

13.  The syllabus outline and assignments are subject to change.

 

14.  Alumni Networking Project.  We will work collaboratively with an existing list of connected alumni to determine possible online networking strategies to share information and offer advice.  The alumni are our social studies teaching and history graduates currently teaching or working in various education-related fields.  Our first Alumni-Mentor is Melissa Seideman and others will join us as the semester progresses. Candidates must register for her blog listed below.

We will be working with an Ithaca College Alumni-Mentor!

Melissa Seideman, a 2006 Social Studies Teacher Education graduate, has kindly agreed to serve as our first Pedagogy and Practice in the Teaching Social Studies Alumni Mentor.  We will add additional Alumni Mentors as the semester progresses.  Please follow Melissa’s instructions to subscribe to her blog and to follow the Monday evening Social Studies Twitter chat -

Blog: They can add it in Google Reader or subscribe to it (see steps 1 and 2) 

1. Go to http://notanotherhistoryteacher.edublogs.org/

2. Scroll down to "subscribe to this blog" and enter their email and click "subscribe"

Blog Contact: They can contact me via "comment" on any blog post and I will respond, send me a message in twitter, or click the "about me" page and click "contact me." I will respond either way! 

You need to stress Twitter. It has been the BEST forms of PD I have EVER found. 

--Tell them to add me on twitter and tweet me @mseideman 

-Every Monday Night 7-8 PM social studies teachers around the world follow #sschat Each week is a different question/prompt. After the chat I save so many useful websites, teaching handouts, lesson ideas that ACTUAL teachers have used. 

--Here is a post about  #sschat and the benefits of using twitter as a social studies teacher  http://www.sschat.org/

 

Additional Resources

New York State Social Studies Standards

https://www.engageny.org/resource/new-york-state-k-12-social-studies-framework  http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/home.html

National Council for the Social Studies and National Standards

http://www.socialstudies.org 

http://www.socialstudies.org/standards/strands  

National History Education

http://teachinghistory.org

World History Connected

http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/

National Center for History in the Schools

http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/nchs

Hacker/Fister, Documenting History Papers

http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/RES5e_ch10_s1-0001.html  

Social Studies History Teaching Resources

http://www.historyteacher.net

How to Write History Essays and do research

http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/index.htm

http://www.arts.cornell.edu/prh3/257/classmats/papertip.html

An essay writing guide from our Canadian friends -

http://www.historyandclassics.ualberta.ca/~/media/history/MainPage/GuideEssays.pdf

Literacy in Social Studies (includes very useful charts)

http://www.readingquest.org/strat

Media Literacy

http://www.projectlooksharp.org

 

Field Experience Record:

You will record our class field visits and most important your ten hours of field experiences with both assigned student teaching mentors (at least five hours with each mentor)

You should submit a record of your field experiences through Taskstream in the Teacher Education folio or online at http://tinyurl.com/ICfieldrecord.  You are responsible for submitting all of your field experience hours by deadline for this course. Answers to frequently asked questions are available in the Taskstream Teacher Education folio under the “Field Experience/Student Teaching Overview.”  If you have additional questions about how to submit hours, please contact the Field Experience Coordinator, Emily Hess, at ehess@ithaca.edu or 194 Phillips Hall Annex.

 

Student Disability Services:

In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, reasonable accommodation will be provided to students with documented disabilities on a case-by-case basis. Students must register with Student Disability Services and provide appropriate documentation to Ithaca College before any academic adjustment will be provided.

Statement on Academic Conduct:

The Ithaca College Policy Manual describes the Standards of Academic Content embedded in the Student Code of Conduct.  It is the responsibility of every student and faculty member to be familiar with, and comply with, these expectations for rigor, authenticity, trust, and honesty in academic work. You may find the full policy at the following web link:

http://www.ithaca.edu/policies/vol7/undergrad/070204/

As your instructor, I am responsible for reporting suspected academic dishonesty to the College, and students who are aware of—but do not report—academic dishonesty by others can be held responsible for failing to report it. We will discuss this policy more thoroughly in our course. As the Policy Manual states, “Because Ithaca College is an academic community, ignorance of the accepted standards of academic honesty in no way affects the responsibility of students who violate standards of conduct in courses and other academic activities.”

Protecting Your Health:

Diminished mental health, including significant stress, mood changes, excessive worry, or problems with eating and/or sleeping can interfere with optimal academic performance. The source of symptoms might be related to your course work; if so, please speak with me.  However, problems with relationships, family worries, loss, or a personal struggle or crisis can also contribute to decreased academic performance. Ithaca College provides cost-free mental health services through the Center for Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) to help you manage personal challenges that threaten your personal or academic well-being.

 

In the event I suspect you need additional support, expect that I will express to you my concerns and the reasons for them.  It is not my intent to know the details of what might be troubling you, but simply to let you know I am concerned and that help (e.g., CAPS, Health Center, Chaplains, etc.), if needed, is available. Remember, getting help is a smart and courageous thing to do -- for yourself and for your loved ones.

Attendance:

As per the Ithaca College Attendance Policy, students who miss class due to their religious beliefs or due to a verifiable family or individual health emergency will be excused. I reserve the right to request documentation of the reason for the absence. Please inform me as soon as possible if you must be absent from our class.

 

Course Schedule and Assignments

Week   1    August 27

Introduction to the course

History and debate over the social studies: "Why Should We Study the Social Studies?"

Student presentation: "Why Do I Want to Teach Social Studies?”

Educ: http://www.ithaca.edu/wise

http://www.edexcellence.net

Reflections on teacher role models. 

For next week prepare a current events/contemporary history lesson related to 9/11 to teach on our class next week that falls on 9/11.  Please refer to the lesson plan format found above

Review next week’s websites.

Read Stearns Chapters 8, 9, 10 and Kottler, Galavan Chapter 1        

 

Week   2    Sept. 8

Planning in the core subject fields of the social studies: History, Government, Geography and other related academic disciplines and creating communities of learners.  NCSS Thematic and Disciplinary Standards (find links above in section 3 of the Course Requirements)

First candidate teaching exercise – a topic related to 9/11

News: http://www.nytimes.com               

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/ and http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/

http://www.pbs.org http://www.pbs.org/topics/history/  http://www.pbs.org/topics/news-politics/

Gov.: http://thomas.loc.gov/ and http://loc.gov

http://civnet.org

History:

http://teachinghistory.org

http://www.besthistorysites.net

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/modsbook.html 

http://vlib.iue.it/history/index.html

http://worldhistoryconnected.org

http://www.rulers.org

http://www.historymatters.gmu.edu

http://womeninworldhistory.com

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/

http://www.einaudi.cornell.edu (outreach) http://einaudi.cornell.edu/outreach

For discussion – Stearns, et. al. Knowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 8, 9, 10.

 

Week   3.     Sept. 15

An Introduction to the Middle School and Grades 7-8 Social Studies.  Content planning in history and the social sciences within the middle school social studies curriculum

Diversity of historical approaches and an evaluation of social studies websites discussion

New York State Social Studies Standards

https://www.engageny.org/resource/new-york-state-k-12-social-studies-framework   http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/home.html  

National Council for the Social Studies and National Standards

http://www.socialstudies.org   

http://www.socialstudies.org/standards/strands

New York State Council for the Social Studies   

http://www.nyscss.org

Middle States Council for the Social Studies

http://mscfss.weebly.com/

National Center for History in the Schools

http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/nchs

NEH    

http://edsitement.neh.gov

Field Experience

An introduction to Middle School social studies – We meet at Boynton Middle School at 1:30 pm!

Apply the Galavan Chapter 1 reading to our Boynton field experience

For discussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 11 and 18

Read for next week – Knowing Teaching, Chapter 6, Loewen, Chapter 3, Kottler and Galavan, Chapter 2

 

Week   4.     Sept. 22

A review and evaluation of the New York State Curriculum in United States History and Government and relevant NCSS thematic and disciplinary strands and standards

Workshop – the social studies classroom – planning, organization and creativity

Selection of United States unit topic and format

 

Incorporating resources to make social studies real

Identifying and developing instructional goals, objectives and assessment strategies for lesson and unit plan development and implementation. 

DiscussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapter 6

Loewen, Teaching What Really Happened, Introduction and Chapter 3

Kottler, Chapter 2

Content and Application Plan on Current Events is due!             

 

Week   5.     Sept 29

Workshop - curriculum mapping, literacy, lesson and unit planning, Ithaca City School District High School Social Studies Department

Literacy strategies in the social studies and formal and informal methods of assessing student learning 

Discussion and application of behavioral objectives and critical thinking development in a social studies/historical context

Develop literacy to build social studies skills

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapter 6

Meeting with Ithaca High School Principal, Jarett Powers – IC Alumni Mentor and/or members of the social studies department

An introduction to the New York State Regents Examination

Organizational Development: Connections and Meeting the Standards

The American Historical Association

http://www.historians.org

C-SPAN

http://americanpresidents.org

New York State Regents exams

http://regentsprep.org

Review strategies

http://www.studystack.com http://www.studystack.com/History

Field Experience

We meet at Ithaca High School at 1:30 pm!

 

Week   6.     Oct. 6

Student teaching exercise in US History and discussion of units

The United States History Unit Plan is due this week!

Creating a history timeline

Timelines

 

http://cybraryman.com/timelines.html

http://thwt.org/index.php/presentations-multimedia/timelines

Online History Games

http://thwt.org/multimedia/games/

The Historical Text Archive

http://historicaltextarchive.com

The National Archives

http://www.nationalarchives.com

Subscribe to the H-Net Listserve edited for Social Studies Teacher Education Professionals:

http://www.h-net.msu.edu/~highs/                            

DiscussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapter 15

 

Week   7.     Oct. 13

Field Experience at the Frederick Douglas Academy in Harlem 

This will include a lesson plan assignment

 

Week   8.     Oct. 20

Literacy – http://www.readingquest.org/strat

Applied literacy strategies in the social studies classroom

Literacy and writing in the social studies curriculum; lesson adaptations for struggling readers and writers

Motivating student learning and literacy through clear, interactive and innovative social studies lessons and activities

Discussion of Kottler and Gallavan, Chapters 5, 6, 7

Curriculum development in Global History: a review of themes and sources.

New York Social Studies Curriculum in Global History and related NCSS Strands

Creating a Global History narrative

Selection of Global History topic

DiscussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 7, 20, 21

We will meet at Cornell University to become acquainted with Einaudi Center International Studies outreach materials for high school social studies classes

 

Week   9.     Oct. 27

Schools in rural communities: Planning, assessment and collaboration between faculty, administrators and community

Field Experience

We meet at Newark Valley School at 1:00 pm with Superintendent Ryan Dougherty, IC Alumni Mentor or Spencer Van-Etten High School with Social Studies Chair Andy McGee, IC Alumni Mentor

 

Week   10.  Nov. 3

Alternative Education Models and Media Impact on Student Learning of Social Studies –

Technology Infusion and Innovation into the Social Studies Classroom – Prof. Dennis Charsky, IC Alumni Mentor

Melissa Seidemann – IC Mentor conversation through Skype

http://www.h-net.org/~edweb/

Progress reports on the Global History Unit.

Integrating technology to enrich learning

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapter 10

http://www.projectlooksharp.org

 

Week   11.   Nov. 10

Discussion and evaluation of the second Unit Plan in Global History and the New York State

Standards: Themes and Resources. 

An integrated and comparative world historical approach

Powerful activities to engage learners

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapter 11

Journal Reports on meetings with mentor teachers

Global:

http://www.plattsburgh.edu/legacy

http://www.un.org

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/

http://memory.loc.gov

The Global History unit plan is Due Dec. 2. Student Teaching Exercise in Global History

Field Experience

We meet at Ithaca High School 1:30 pm.

 

Week   12.  Nov. 17

Global History unit plan update

Assessment of Student Learning

Student centered learning in planning and assessment

Community Resources -

Aging studies in the social studies: Intergenerational Collaboration and Older Adults as Sources of History.

Public and Local History – The History Center of Tompkins County

Curriculum Development in Economics Learning Standards Center for Economic Education at Ithaca College

http://www.ithaca.edu/stcee  

http://www.ithaca.edu/aging/schools  

http://www.thehistorycenter.net

For discussion – Knowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapter 14

Kottler and Galavan, Chapter 4

 

THANKSGIVING BREAK – NOV 24

Competing World Views in the Social Studies Classroom – Finish reading and prepare for a discussion of the Loewen and D’Souza books. The Comparative Book Critique is due Dec. 3

 

Week   13.   December 1

Instructional Assessment Strategies in the Social Studies: Essays, Objective Question and the N.Y. State Regents Examinations.

 

DBQs - Document Based Questions and the Use of Primary Sources.

Document Based Assessment Activities for US History

Document Based Assessment for Global History

Regents Exam Prep Center: http://regentsprep.org

For discussion – Knowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 9 and 22

                       

Week   14.    Dec. 8

Alumni Networking Project – summary, results and next steps

Professional collaboration, communication and networking

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapters 8 and 12

The Social Studies Teaching Profession: Past, Present and Future.    

Final Revisions of Unit Plans are due!  

Teaching lessons with your mentor teachers.

 

Week   15.    

EXAMINATION WEEK

Field Experience – visit Lehman Alternative Community School and Media Literacy, Project LookSharp: interpreting varied media in the 7-12 social studies classroom, Chris Sperry, IC Alumni Mentor

 

Teaching lessons with your mentor social studies teachers.

The Final Portfolio is due December

 

         

 

 

Scoring Rubric for NCSS Standards within Unit Plan

 

NCSS Standards

3 points

2 points

1 point

0 points

1.1 Culture and Cultural Diversity. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of anthropology and history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.2 Time, Continuity, and Change. Be familiar with the history of the United States, western civilization, and non-western society

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.3 People, Places, and Environments. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of geography

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.4 Individual Development and Identity. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of psychology

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.5 Individuals, Groups, and Institutions. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of sociology and history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.6 Power, Authority, and Governance. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of political science and history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.7 Production, Distribution, and Consumption. Understand the basic concepts of micro- and macro-economics

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.8 Science, Technology, and Society. Understand the manner by which science and technology have enhanced or threatened the development of human society in history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.9 Global Connections. Understand that our planet has been exposed to an ever-increasing human interdependence in a world made smaller by improvements in communication, transportation, and trade throughout history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.10 Civic Ideals and Practices. Understand the basic concepts of citizenship in a democratic society today and throughout history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

 

               

 

 

                Scoring Rubric for Unit Plan

NCSS

NYSED

Indicator

3 Points

2 Points

1 Point

0 Points

 

 

 

Context

 

A description of the context includes in-depth information about the school, community, classroom, and students for whom the unit has been designed.  This contextual information is considered in terms of its implications for planning.

 

A description of the context includes information about the school, classroom, and students for whom the unit has been designed.

 

Some contextual information is included but not enough to help guide the development of appropriate plans.

 

A description of the context is not provided.

 

 

3.1

 

Rationale

 

A clear, thoughtful, well-written rationale establishes the importance of and reasons for teaching this unit. The unit’s “big ideas” or essential questions are identified and discussed.  Theoretical perspective and/or research support is provided.

 

A clear, thoughtful, well-written rationale establishes the importance of and reasons for teaching this unit. The unit’s “big ideas” or essential questions are identified and discussed.

 

A rationale is included and describes the reasons for teaching this unit.

 

A rationale for including this unit in

the curriculum is not provided or is

vague and superficial.

All

NCSS

Standards

 

2.4

 

Standards

 

State, national, and/or common core standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

 

State, national, and/or common core standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards.

 

State, national, and/or common core standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

 

Standards are not included and/or

 lack congruence with unit rationale

 and goals.

 

 

2.4

 

Unit Goals

 

Clear, meaningful, challenging, multidisciplinary goals and/or themes are provided for the unit and are congruent with the unit rationale.  Essential knowledge/skills and enduring understandings are identified. 

 

Unit goals are congruent with the unit rationale and are clear, meaningful, and challenging.

 

Unit goals appear congruent with the unit rationale but are very general and unclear.

 

Unit goals are not included and/or

lack congruence with the unit rationale.

 

 

3.6, 5.1, 5.2

 

Assessments

 

Assessment plan includes a carefully-selected and sequenced set of multiple methods of both formative and summative assessment, with clear alignment to unit goals and a clear rationale for selection of assessments that are culturally sensitive and fair.

 

Assessment plan includes varied formative and summative assessments, aligned with unit goals and supported by a rationale for the selection of assessments that are culturally sensitive and fair.

 

Assessment plan includes formative and summative assessment but assessments are not clearly aligned with unit goals and/or the rationale provided for selection is not clear.

 

Assessment plan includes only

one method of assessment and/

lacks alignment with unit goals

or rationale and/or lacks a rationale

 for selection of assessments.

 

 

1.2, 1.6, 2.3, 3.1, 3.4

 

Literacy

 

State literacy standards are identified and congruent with the unit’s goals. Research-supported instructional practices in reading, writing, vocabulary, and oral language development are effectively integrated throughout the unit.  Plan shows respect for varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

 

 

State literacy standards are identified and addressed through the use of several approaches to literacy instruction and scaffolding in reading, writing, vocabulary, and/or oral language development.  Plan shows respect for varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

 

State literacy standards are identified as being addressed in the unit, but the integration of literacy instruction and scaffolding in the unit is not clear.

 

There is little or no evidence of

literacy being incorporated into the unit.

 

 

 

1.6, 3.4, 3.5

 

Technology

 

A range of media/technology is incorporated into the unit in carefully designed and innovative ways and is logically congruent with the unit goals, identified standards, and planned instruction.

 

 

Media/technology is integrated in a meaningful way into the larger instructional plan for the unit.

 

Media/technology is used in the unit, but its use is not clearly congruent with the unit.

 

There is no evidence of media/technology

being used in the unit or the media/tech

use is alluded to but not clear.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1

 

Weekly Plan

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, coherent weekly plan that contains varied, carefully-sequenced, innovative, developmentally-appropriate, culturally-responsive approaches to content-rich and multidisciplinary instruction. Multiple, logical forms of assessment are used.

 

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich weekly plan.  Lessons are varied and build logically upon one another.  A plan for assessment is included.

 

Weekly plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or coherence and/or weekly plan lacks a required component.

 

Weekly plan is missing required components

and/or is so general or disorganized that it is

difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #1

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #2

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #3

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #4

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #5

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

EDUC 50910: PEDAGOGY AND PRACTICE IN THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES

Fall 2014; 03 Credit Hours

Zenon V. Wasyliw                                                                              

Professor, Department of History and

Department of Education

Ithaca College

Muller 427 http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/11.2/bolgatz.html

wasyliw@ithaca.edu  274-1587 or 274-3303                                                            

http://faculty.ithaca.edu/wasyliw                                                            

Office Hours: Monday 12:00-1:00; Tuesday 4:00-5:00

Thursday 1:00-2:00

By appointment other days and times

I am often in my office additional times

Come in if you see my office door open

Class Meeting Time: Monday 1:00-3:50

Catalog Course Description:

Examination of current research and practice in the effective teaching of social studies at the middle and high school levels. Focus on national and state standards in social studies, mastery of theoretical concepts and their application in the classroom, instructional planning and differentiation, appropriate use of technology, approaches to assessment, and the integration of literacy in the social studies curriculum. Introduction to professional organizations, journals, and resources. Field experience required. Prerequisite: Graduate student in good standing or permission of instructor. 3 credits. (F, Y)

 

All-College Teacher Education Mission:

The All-College Teacher Education Unit at Ithaca College embraces the values of Knowledge, Competence, and Commitment to Service. Our mission is to prepare teachers who possess knowledge and teaching competence in their respective disciplines, who know how to work collaboratively and effectively with diverse communities of students and families, and who are inspired and motivated by the belief that excellence and equity in education are profoundly interdependent. To this end, Ithaca College teacher educators guide candidates through carefully designed and supervised programs where theory, research, and practice combine in order to provide them with solid foundations in the content, professional, pedagogical, technological, relational, and cultural knowledge and experiences needed in order to become engaged and effective teachers for all students in the 21st century.

 

The values and commitments found in the Unit’s Conceptual Framework are embedded in the following Ithaca College Teacher Education Program Standards. These eight Standards, when aligned with the New York State Teaching Standards and the Specialized Professional Association Standards, ensure that the All-College Teacher Education Unit’s goals of Knowledge, Competence, and Commitment to Service are attained. The Ithaca College Teacher Education Program Standards reflect the shared values and expectations of our teacher education faculty and stakeholders and are used to assess the readiness of every teacher education candidate at Ithaca College.

 

Ithaca College Teacher Education Professional Standards (IC TEPS)

Standard 1 - Content Knowledge: Ithaca College teaching professionals demonstrate a rich, thorough understanding of the content and skill knowledge, theories, and issues comprising their disciplines.

Standard 2 - Planning and Instruction/Implementation: Ithaca College teaching professionals are able to plan and implement effective, developmentally appropriate lessons and curricula based upon sound principles of content knowledge and skill development.

Standard 3 - Positive Learning Environment: Ithaca College teaching professionals create safe and motivational learning environments that encourage all students to become actively involved.

Standard 4 - Diversity: Ithaca College teaching professionals respect and possess knowledge of diversity in its many forms and know how to use this competence to develop relationships, instruction, schools, classrooms, communities and experiences that help all students achieve to their fullest potential and function effectively and respectfully in a diverse world.            

Standard 5 - Technology: Ithaca College teaching professionals are able to effectively utilize technology to enhance student learning and professional growth and development.

Standard 6 - Assessment: Ithaca College teaching professionals demonstrate the ability to develop and utilize a variety of assessment tools and techniques designed to evaluate student learning and performance, provide feedback, and shape future lesson planning, programs, and curricula.

Standard 7 - Collaboration and Outreach: Ithaca College teaching professionals foster positive relationships with a variety of target groups (e.g. students, families, colleagues, local community members, etc.) in order to promote and enhance the teaching and learning environment.

Standard 8 - Professional Development: Ithaca College teaching professionals engage in reflective practice and continually seek to improve their knowledge base and effectiveness as teachers, make positive contributions to the culture of their fields, and demonstrate the dispositions of an emerging professional.

 

Department of Education Mission:

Grounded in the rich traditions of the liberal arts and social sciences, and in keeping with the Ithaca College mission statement, the Department of Education prepares students to take responsibility for citizenship and service in the global community. This preparation takes place in several ways. The Department seeks to develop future teachers who are not only well-educated in their disciplines, but are also culturally responsive, caring, and knowledgeable in their interactions with students and their families. The Department also reaches out to the larger Ithaca College student body through courses and programs designed to equip them with the necessary skills for well-informed, critically reflective, participatory citizenship and service in their neighborhood schools and communities.  In addition, faculty and students in the Department of Education value, support, and engage in collaboration, discussion, and dialogue with a variety of local and regional community partners in order to be of assistance in addressing educational issues of concern and importance to them. In these ways, knowledge, competence, and service come together in our students to nurture a lifelong commitment to the democratic quest for excellence and equity in our schools and society.

 

Course Objectives, Goals and Purposes:

This course emphasizes teaching grades 7-12 social studies at the middle and secondary levels with special reference to the New York State Social Studies curriculum and the five Social Studies learning standards.  We also infuse the NCSS (National Council for the Social Studies) National Standards for Social Studies Teachers, aligning our program with NCATE (National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education) requirements.  This course examines and applies subject-specific methods and materials, including the assessment of student work, and teaching middle and secondary school students of varying needs, backgrounds, interests and levels of academic preparation.  Conceptualizing, organizing, presenting, and evaluating historical and social science content through curriculum development, instructional planning and strategies is particularly important.  This course introduces the practical application of history and each social science in relation to specific curricular demands through the framework of learning processes, motivation, communication and classroom management.  Instructional technology, literacy in the social studies, and the action research process are also integrated through a variety of applications. Mastery of both theoretical concepts and their application in the classroom is essential.  This class often meets in a public school setting with a significant field experience component

 

Required Readings:

D’Souza, Dinesh.  What’s So Great about America.

Loewen, James W. Teaching What Really Happened

Kottler, Ellen and Nancy P. Gallavan, Secrets to Success for Social Studies Teachers

Stearns, Peter, Peter Seixas and Sam Weinburg, Knowing Teaching and Learning History.

 

Grade Explanations:

A=       Clearly exceptional work for an undergraduate student. Outstanding, original, excellent.

B=       Above average work for an undergraduate student. Very good, consistently thoughtful,

            and analytical.

C=       Average work for an undergraduate student. Met minimum requirements, intermittently

thoughtful, insightful, and/or analytical. Satisfactory.

D=       See me immediately for individual help. Not acceptable work.

F=        See me immediately.  Failure to meet minimal expectations.

 

Grading for this course will be based on the following:

Two Social Studies unit plans, 25% each unit                                                  50%

Comparative book critique, Mentor teacher journal                                         20%

Graduate Project and three article evaluations                                                 15%

Participation, presentations, weekly journal, FDA                                           15%                                                                                                                                                    100%

 

Assignment Details:

1. Candidates must engage in quality discussions of assigned readings and must complete all written assignments.

2. Attendance is mandatory.  There are no un-excused absences.  “Students at Ithaca College are expected to attend all classes, and they are responsible for work missed during any absence from class.” Ithaca College Catalog, 2011-12).

http://www.ithaca.edu/provost/docs/apc/apcapprovepolicies/AttendancePolicy.pdf

3. Candidates complete two unit plans, one in United States history and one in global history both directly related to the spring student teaching assignment.  The units must include detailed innovative lesson plans with evidence of strong content mastery, infused with instructional technology and support for adolescent literacy and varied assessment strategies for diverse learners. 

Candidates will identify, assess and apply the ten thematic NCSS standards and the five New York State Social Studies Standards through the construction of curriculum units. 

http://downloads.ncss.org/NCSSTeacherStandardsVol1-rev2004.pdf

http://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/home.html

 

One-week Curriculum Unit in U.S. History and Civic Engagement/Government

Students are required to demonstrate content and pedagogical content knowledge related to NCSS standards 1.1 (Culture and Cultural Diversity) 1.2 (Time, Continuity and Change) 1.3 (People, Places and Environment) 1.5 (Individuals, Groups and Institutions) 1.6 (Power, Authority and Governance) 1.8 (Science, Technology and Society) 1.10 (Civic Ideas and Practices). New York State Standards in US History and Government are met.

 

One-week Curriculum Unit in Global History, Geography and Economics

Students are requires to demonstrate content and pedagogical content knowledge related to 1.1 (Culture and Cultural Diversity) 1.2 (Time, Continuity and Change) 1.3 (People, Places and Environment) 1.5 (Individuals, Groups and Institutions) 1.7 (Production, Distribution and Consumption) 1.9 (Global Connections). New York State Standards in Global History, Geography and Economics are met.

The Economics Standard and NCSS 1.7 can be alternatively assessed within the U.S. History Unit

Lesson Reflection

After the lesson has been taught, discuss any adaptations you made while teaching this lesson or plan to make if this lesson is repeated in the future. Explain why you made (or would make, in the future) these changes. How were these changes informed by your students’ learning?

 

Lesson Plan Format for Teacher Education Candidates

Ithaca  College School of Humanities and Sciences

Overview without Detailed Directions

 

file:///C:/Users/wasyliw/Downloads/Lesson%20Plan%20Overview%20HS%20062414.pdf

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plan Format for Teacher Education Candidates

Ithaca College School of Humanities and Sciences
 

Name

 

Lesson Title or Topic

 

Grade Level

 

Course Name or Content Area

 

 

Context

1. Explain the larger context in which this lesson fits.  For example, explain what larger unit would be going on at the time of this lesson and how this lesson fits into the unit. 

2. State the long-range learning objective/s to which this lesson contributes. The long-range objectives should deal with mastery of knowledge/skills that students will be able to transfer to real-life situations. 

3. Describe the students for whom this lesson has been developed.  Consider the personal, cultural, and community assets of your students.

 

Central Focus

Identify the central focus for the content/skill you will teach in this learning segment (a lesson or series of lessons). The central focus should address the important understandings and core concepts/skills you want student to develop in this lesson or series of lessons.

 

State/National Content Standards (Common Core State Standards)

List the number and full text of each standard that is addressed in this lesson.

Remember to include content and literacy standards, as appropriate to the lesson.

 

Objectives and Assessments

--Here list the short-range learning objectives specific to this particular learning segment.  These objectives should be items that are immediately observable and easily assessed.

--In addition, you will identify how you will know if the learning objectives have been met. List the types of assessments you will use to determine whether the objectives have been met. List the types of formative assessments you will use to monitor student learning of your short-range learning objectives for this lesson. What assessments will determine proficiency, excellence, or failure to meet the learning objectives?

--As you consider your assessments, you should think about the kind(s) of feedback your students will receive from you related to your assessments and how will you expect them to use this feedback.

Learning Objectives

The students will be able to …

 

 

 

 

 

Note: If you have more than 3 learning objectives, add a new row for each objective.

Formative Assessments

What evidence will you gather during the lesson to monitor whether your students are developing the understanding/skills required to meet the learning objective you have identified?

Note: Every objective should have a formative assessment.

Summative Assessments

What evidence, by the end of this learning segment, will show that students understand and have met your learning objectives?

 

Note: You might have duplicative assessments, or no summative assessments, for your learning objectives in this lesson.

1.

1.

1.

2.

2.

2.

3.

3.

3.

Prior Knowledge

What knowledge, skills, and concepts must students already know to be successful with this lesson?

How will you know if your students have prior knowledge, etc.?  Where will you teach/re-teach if necessary?

 

 

       

 

Academic Language

Academic language function

Choose one of these higher order language verbs (or another appropriate to your learning objectives): analyze, evaluate, explain, interpret, describe, predict, argue, or prove.  How will you help them do this verb (a.k.a academic language function) during or as a result of this lesson?  (Include how you will use students’ prior knowledge and your teaching in this lesson to facilitate and deepen student learning of this academic language skill.)

 

Language demands

What skill vocabulary (e.g., Venn diagram, graphic organizer, thesis statement) and content vocabulary (e.g., imperialism, mitosis) do students need to know in order to succeed?

Language supports

How will you help students understand the verbal and written language requirements to succeed in this lesson? (These should also be included in your step-by-step procedures below.)

 

 

 

Lesson Procedures: Instructional Strategies/ Learning Tasks

Describe, in detail, the steps you will follow in the lesson, attending to both what you will be doing and what the students will be doing. Boldface all procedures where you are monitoring student understanding using formative assessments.

Opening

How will you begin your lesson in a way that motivates and engages students in learning this lesson’s content? (Motivation for lessons should be interesting, age-level appropriate, brief, and directly related to the learning objectives of the lesson.)

1.

Step-by-Step Procedures

Time

List the next steps of your lesson. Provide detailed description of what teacher and students will be doing.  Boldface those procedures where teacher is monitoring student understanding during the lesson. (Your planned formative assessments from above should show up In this section as part of your lesson procedures.) Add rows below as needed.

Write lesson plan procedures so that another teacher could pick up your plans and actually accomplish your objectives for the class period.  (Hint: The following procedural terms are too vague: introduce, discuss, review.  How will you introduce something new?  How will you organize discussion, and what questions will you ask?  How will you conduct a review?) 

 

2.

 

3.

 

4.

 

5.

Closure

How will you bring this lesson to closure? How will students reflect on what they learned today, and how will you prepare them for what’s ahead?

6.

 

Differentiation

Universal Design

What general features of your procedures and/or assessment help support the learning of all students by making the lesson appropriate, feasible, and supportive for every student in the class?

 

Students with Specific Learning Needs (to be completed below)

What are some of the specific learning needs possessed by students in your class, and how do your plans intentionally support these students’ learning? Connect your support to the specific step-by-step procedures listed above (included the step number where you will adapt, if appropriate).

IEP/ 504 Plans (classifications/needs)

 

Supports, Accommodations, Modifications, Pertinent IEP Goals

 

 

Other Learning Needs

Examples: Struggling readers, English language learners, gifted students, etc.

Supports, Accommodations, Modifications

 

 

 

Instructional Resources/Materials

List here the resources you will use to engage students in learning.

Include handouts, slides, supplies, images, grouping plans, manipulatives, equipment, or anything else that requires advance preparation. Written materials should be attached to this plan.

 

 

Theoretical Principles/ Research-Based Practices

What research/theory supports your lesson design? Explain.

 

References

Include here (1) the specific references for the research and theory cited in the section above, and (2) any professional resources from which one or more parts of this plan have been borrowed/adapted. (If a mentor teacher shared plans, please credit him or her.)

 

 

Lesson Reflection

After the lesson has been taught, discuss any adaptations you made while teaching this lesson or plan to make if this lesson is repeated in the future. Explain why you made (or would make, in the future) these changes. How were these changes informed by your students’ learning?

 

 

 

 

**Designing a Unit Plan

Unit Plan Design: To maintain a consistent approach to lesson planning across all core education courses, the following components of a unit plan are required:Title of Unit: Create a title for your unit plan that makes clear its basic content.

Context: Indicate the subject/course, grade and level for which this unit has been developed. Include here information about (a) the contextual factors impacting the unit and (b) the intended learners for which this unit is planned.

Rationale: Explain the rationale for including this unit in the curriculum for this grade level. Why are you teaching this unit? What are the benefits for the students? 

State/National Standards Addressed: Specify which NCSS and New York state social studies standards are addressed in this unit plan.  Cite the standards by number, and provide a succinct description using the language of the standard.

Unit Goals: List the general overarching goal(s), theme(s), and/or essential questions for the unit as a whole.

Assessments: Provide an overview of the formative and summative assessments to be used in your unit. Include a culminating unit assessment that provides evidence of the effects of instruction on student learning. Explain your rationale for selecting/developing this particular approach to assessment for your unit. (Remember that your planned assessments should align with the standards and goals you have selected as being key to this unit.)  

Literacy: Identify the literacy objectives that will be taught as part of this unit.  Please reference the New York Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. Describe how you will integrate attention to these literacy objectives across your unit.  In what ways does your unit support the continuing literacy development of the students for whom you have planned this unit?  Consider the following: pre, during and post-reading activities; writing to learn across the curriculum; vocabulary development; oral language development; etc.

Technology: Describe the ways in which your unit incorporates the use of appropriate, effective technology to enhance student learning. 

Unit Plan Organization: The unit plan is comprised of a minimum number of lesson plans as specified by your instructor; for most courses a minimum of five lesson plans is required. Fill out a weekly content outline containing: learning objectives, assessments, basic procedures/activities, and any readings or homework for each day of the week (see next page for a basic structure for your content outline).

Lesson Plans: Each daily lesson plan in the unit must include:

  • all the components of a complete lesson as delineated in the Ithaca College “Designing a Lesson Plan” guidelines (see attached); each lesson plan must include differentiation.
  • all supplemental materials (e.g., PowerPoint slides, handouts, assessments with scoring guides). 

**Assessment rubrics are found at the end of the syllabus.

 

Each unit is selected in consultation with assigned mentors of the spring student teaching semester.  The ideal goal is to teach each unit during the spring student teaching professional semester. Mastery learning - students must make qualitative revisions of submitted units for inclusion in the final portfolio.

4. Candidates meet with and work closely with their assigned mentor teachers during this semester in preparation for their student teaching during the professional semester. Students observe their mentor teachers’ classes and co-teach several classes after close consultation.  A descriptive and reflective Mentor journal must be kept both chronicling and assessing this collaboration.  Students will share unit plans with mentors. Mentor collaborative field experience will total a minimum of ten hours.

5. Candidates must keep a weekly reflective journal summarizing and evaluating course assignments and activities. A class project will also involve developing a social studies teaching bulletin board on the fourth floor of Muller Faculty Center next to my office.

6. A comparative critique of the Loewen and D’Souza books.

7. Candidates will need to prepare and submit a formal lesson plan developed for and taught at FDA during Fall Break. More specific instructions will be shared prior to the FDA trip.

 

8. Candidates must submit a final portfolio containing two revised unit plans, mentor teacher journal, weekly reflective journal, evaluations of five most valuable websites, article evaluations and other required work.

9.  Article evaluation – Graduate level requirement of three articles from the Knowing Teaching and Learning History are to be carefully and critically evaluated in a four page analytical critique.

10.  Ithaca College and Local Social Studies Resources Project – Graduate level candidates will identify, in consultation with the instructor, Ithaca College and Ithaca area social studies related resources.  They will summarize and evaluate resource curricular connections to the National Council for the Social Studies Standards and New York State Social Studies Standards, identify useful connections to classroom teaching and assessment. The completed project will be published as an online resource link.  Resources include: Project Look Sharp, Aging in the Social Studies Curriculum, CSCRE, The Einaudi Center for International Studies at Cornell University, The History Center of Tompkins County and other potential resources.

11.  Graduate Action Research Based Project.  All candidates for the Master of Arts in Teaching are required to complete an action research based project that centers on significant practices in the content area.  This discipline-based project will be developed and researched in this course, implemented during the semester of student teaching, and assessed and critically reviewed in the seminar that accompanies student teaching and as part of the final portfolio.  This will be done in close collaboration with the Pedagogy and Practice across the Disciplines Seminar and the Director of Graduate Studies.  Graduate students will also serve as tutors with the Ithaca High School AVID program Advancement via Individual Determination also in collaboration with the Pedagogy and Practice across the Disciplines Seminar.

12.  Candidates are expected to become members of a professional Social Studies organization.  Membership in the New York State Council for the Social Studies (NYSCSS) is required http://www.nyscss.org/ and is only $15. Other optional memberships in the Middle States Council for the Social Studies, National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS), and the National Council for History Education (NCHE).

 

13.  The syllabus outline and assignments are subject to change.

 

14.  Alumni Networking Project.  We will work collaboratively with an existing list of connected alumni to determine possible online networking strategies to share information and offer advice.  The alumni are our social studies teaching and history graduates currently teaching or working in various education-related fields.  Our first Alumni-Mentor is Melissa Seideman and others will join us as the semester progresses. Candidates must register for her blog listed below.

We will be working with an Ithaca College Alumni-Mentor!

Melissa Seideman, a 2006 Social Studies Teacher Education graduate, has kindly agreed to serve as our first Pedagogy and Practice in the Teaching Social Studies Alumni Mentor.  We will add additional Alumni Mentors as the semester progresses.  Please follow Melissa’s instructions to subscribe to her blog and to follow the Monday evening Social Studies Twitter chat -

Blog: They can add it in Google Reader or subscribe to it (see steps 1 and 2) 

1. Go to http://notanotherhistoryteacher.edublogs.org/

2. Scroll down to "subscribe to this blog" and enter their email and click "subscribe"

Blog Contact: They can contact me via "comment" on any blog post and I will respond, send me a message in twitter, or click the "about me" page and click "contact me." I will respond either way! 

You need to stress Twitter. It has been the BEST forms of PD I have EVER found. 

--Tell them to add me on twitter and tweet me @mseideman 

-Every Monday Night 7-8 PM social studies teachers around the world follow #sschat Each week is a different question/prompt. After the chat I save so many useful websites, teaching handouts, lesson ideas that ACTUAL teachers have used. 

--Here is a post about  #sschat and the benefits of using twitter as a social studies teacher  http://www.sschat.org/

 

Additional Resources

New York State Social Studies Standards

https://www.engageny.org/resource/new-york-state-k-12-social-studies-framework  http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/home.html

National Council for the Social Studies and National Standards

http://www.socialstudies.org 

http://www.socialstudies.org/standards/strands  

National History Education

http://teachinghistory.org

World History Connected

http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/

National Center for History in the Schools

http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/nchs

Hacker/Fister, Documenting History Papers

http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/RES5e_ch10_s1-0001.html  

Social Studies History Teaching Resources

http://www.historyteacher.net

How to Write History Essays and do research

http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/index.htm

http://www.arts.cornell.edu/prh3/257/classmats/papertip.html

An essay writing guide from our Canadian friends -

http://www.historyandclassics.ualberta.ca/~/media/history/MainPage/GuideEssays.pdf

Literacy in Social Studies (includes very useful charts)

http://www.readingquest.org/strat

Media Literacy

http://www.projectlooksharp.org

 

Field Experience Record:

You will record our class field visits and most important your ten hours of field experiences with both assigned student teaching mentors (at least five hours with each mentor)

You should submit a record of your field experiences through Taskstream in the Teacher Education folio or online at http://tinyurl.com/ICfieldrecord.  You are responsible for submitting all of your field experience hours by deadline for this course. Answers to frequently asked questions are available in the Taskstream Teacher Education folio under the “Field Experience/Student Teaching Overview.”  If you have additional questions about how to submit hours, please contact the Field Experience Coordinator, Emily Hess, at ehess@ithaca.edu or 194 Phillips Hall Annex.

 

Student Disability Services:

In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, reasonable accommodation will be provided to students with documented disabilities on a case-by-case basis. Students must register with Student Disability Services and provide appropriate documentation to Ithaca College before any academic adjustment will be provided.

Statement on Academic Conduct:

The Ithaca College Policy Manual describes the Standards of Academic Content embedded in the Student Code of Conduct.  It is the responsibility of every student and faculty member to be familiar with, and comply with, these expectations for rigor, authenticity, trust, and honesty in academic work. You may find the full policy at the following web link:

http://www.ithaca.edu/policies/vol7/undergrad/070204/

As your instructor, I am responsible for reporting suspected academic dishonesty to the College, and students who are aware of—but do not report—academic dishonesty by others can be held responsible for failing to report it. We will discuss this policy more thoroughly in our course. As the Policy Manual states, “Because Ithaca College is an academic community, ignorance of the accepted standards of academic honesty in no way affects the responsibility of students who violate standards of conduct in courses and other academic activities.”

Protecting Your Health:

Diminished mental health, including significant stress, mood changes, excessive worry, or problems with eating and/or sleeping can interfere with optimal academic performance. The source of symptoms might be related to your course work; if so, please speak with me.  However, problems with relationships, family worries, loss, or a personal struggle or crisis can also contribute to decreased academic performance. Ithaca College provides cost-free mental health services through the Center for Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) to help you manage personal challenges that threaten your personal or academic well-being.

 

In the event I suspect you need additional support, expect that I will express to you my concerns and the reasons for them.  It is not my intent to know the details of what might be troubling you, but simply to let you know I am concerned and that help (e.g., CAPS, Health Center, Chaplains, etc.), if needed, is available. Remember, getting help is a smart and courageous thing to do -- for yourself and for your loved ones.

Attendance:

As per the Ithaca College Attendance Policy, students who miss class due to their religious beliefs or due to a verifiable family or individual health emergency will be excused. I reserve the right to request documentation of the reason for the absence. Please inform me as soon as possible if you must be absent from our class.

 

Course Schedule and Assignments

Week   1    August 27

Introduction to the course

History and debate over the social studies: "Why Should We Study the Social Studies?"

Student presentation: "Why Do I Want to Teach Social Studies?”

Educ: http://www.ithaca.edu/wise

http://www.edexcellence.net

Reflections on teacher role models. 

For next week prepare a current events/contemporary history lesson related to 9/11 to teach on our class next week that falls on 9/11.  Please refer to the lesson plan format found above

Review next week’s websites.

Read Stearns Chapters 8, 9, 10 and Kottler, Galavan Chapter 1        

 

Week   2    Sept. 8

Planning in the core subject fields of the social studies: History, Government, Geography and other related academic disciplines and creating communities of learners.  NCSS Thematic and Disciplinary Standards (find links above in section 3 of the Course Requirements)

First candidate teaching exercise – a topic related to 9/11

News: http://www.nytimes.com               

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/ and http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/

http://www.pbs.org http://www.pbs.org/topics/history/  http://www.pbs.org/topics/news-politics/

Gov.: http://thomas.loc.gov/ and http://loc.gov

http://civnet.org

History:

http://teachinghistory.org

http://www.besthistorysites.net

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/modsbook.html 

http://vlib.iue.it/history/index.html

http://worldhistoryconnected.org

http://www.rulers.org

http://www.historymatters.gmu.edu

http://womeninworldhistory.com

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/

http://www.einaudi.cornell.edu (outreach) http://einaudi.cornell.edu/outreach

For discussion – Stearns, et. al. Knowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 8, 9, 10.

 

Week   3.     Sept. 15

An Introduction to the Middle School and Grades 7-8 Social Studies.  Content planning in history and the social sciences within the middle school social studies curriculum

Diversity of historical approaches and an evaluation of social studies websites discussion

New York State Social Studies Standards

https://www.engageny.org/resource/new-york-state-k-12-social-studies-framework   http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/home.html  

National Council for the Social Studies and National Standards

http://www.socialstudies.org   

http://www.socialstudies.org/standards/strands

New York State Council for the Social Studies   

http://www.nyscss.org

Middle States Council for the Social Studies

http://mscfss.weebly.com/

National Center for History in the Schools

http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/nchs

NEH    

http://edsitement.neh.gov

Field Experience

An introduction to Middle School social studies – We meet at Boynton Middle School at 1:30 pm!

Apply the Galavan Chapter 1 reading to our Boynton field experience

For discussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 11 and 18

Read for next week – Knowing Teaching, Chapter 6, Loewen, Chapter 3, Kottler and Galavan, Chapter 2

 

Week   4.     Sept. 22

A review and evaluation of the New York State Curriculum in United States History and Government and relevant NCSS thematic and disciplinary strands and standards

Workshop – the social studies classroom – planning, organization and creativity

Selection of United States unit topic and format

 

Incorporating resources to make social studies real

Identifying and developing instructional goals, objectives and assessment strategies for lesson and unit plan development and implementation. 

DiscussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapter 6

Loewen, Teaching What Really Happened, Introduction and Chapter 3

Kottler, Chapter 2

Content and Application Plan on Current Events is due!             

 

Week   5.     Sept 29

Workshop - curriculum mapping, literacy, lesson and unit planning, Ithaca City School District High School Social Studies Department

Literacy strategies in the social studies and formal and informal methods of assessing student learning 

Discussion and application of behavioral objectives and critical thinking development in a social studies/historical context

Develop literacy to build social studies skills

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapter 6

Meeting with Ithaca High School Principal, Jarett Powers – IC Alumni Mentor and/or members of the social studies department

An introduction to the New York State Regents Examination

Organizational Development: Connections and Meeting the Standards

The American Historical Association

http://www.historians.org

C-SPAN

http://americanpresidents.org

New York State Regents exams

http://regentsprep.org

Review strategies

http://www.studystack.com http://www.studystack.com/History

Field Experience

We meet at Ithaca High School at 1:30 pm!

 

Week   6.     Oct. 6

Student teaching exercise in US History and discussion of units

The United States History Unit Plan is due this week!

Creating a history timeline

Timelines

 

http://cybraryman.com/timelines.html

http://thwt.org/index.php/presentations-multimedia/timelines

Online History Games

http://thwt.org/multimedia/games/

The Historical Text Archive

http://historicaltextarchive.com

The National Archives

http://www.nationalarchives.com

Subscribe to the H-Net Listserve edited for Social Studies Teacher Education Professionals:

http://www.h-net.msu.edu/~highs/                            

DiscussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapter 15

 

Week   7.     Oct. 13

Field Experience at the Frederick Douglas Academy in Harlem 

This will include a lesson plan assignment

 

Week   8.     Oct. 20

Literacy – http://www.readingquest.org/strat

Applied literacy strategies in the social studies classroom

Literacy and writing in the social studies curriculum; lesson adaptations for struggling readers and writers

Motivating student learning and literacy through clear, interactive and innovative social studies lessons and activities

Discussion of Kottler and Gallavan, Chapters 5, 6, 7

Curriculum development in Global History: a review of themes and sources.

New York Social Studies Curriculum in Global History and related NCSS Strands

Creating a Global History narrative

Selection of Global History topic

DiscussionKnowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 7, 20, 21

We will meet at Cornell University to become acquainted with Einaudi Center International Studies outreach materials for high school social studies classes

 

Week   9.     Oct. 27

Schools in rural communities: Planning, assessment and collaboration between faculty, administrators and community

Field Experience

We meet at Newark Valley School at 1:00 pm with Superintendent Ryan Dougherty, IC Alumni Mentor or Spencer Van-Etten High School with Social Studies Chair Andy McGee, IC Alumni Mentor

 

Week   10.  Nov. 3

Alternative Education Models and Media Impact on Student Learning of Social Studies –

Technology Infusion and Innovation into the Social Studies Classroom – Prof. Dennis Charsky, IC Alumni Mentor

Melissa Seidemann – IC Mentor conversation through Skype

http://www.h-net.org/~edweb/

Progress reports on the Global History Unit.

Integrating technology to enrich learning

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapter 10

http://www.projectlooksharp.org

 

Week   11.   Nov. 10

Discussion and evaluation of the second Unit Plan in Global History and the New York State

Standards: Themes and Resources. 

An integrated and comparative world historical approach

Powerful activities to engage learners

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapter 11

Journal Reports on meetings with mentor teachers

Global:

http://www.plattsburgh.edu/legacy

http://www.un.org

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/

http://memory.loc.gov

The Global History unit plan is Due Dec. 2. Student Teaching Exercise in Global History

Field Experience

We meet at Ithaca High School 1:30 pm.

 

Week   12.  Nov. 17

Global History unit plan update

Assessment of Student Learning

Student centered learning in planning and assessment

Community Resources -

Aging studies in the social studies: Intergenerational Collaboration and Older Adults as Sources of History.

Public and Local History – The History Center of Tompkins County

Curriculum Development in Economics Learning Standards Center for Economic Education at Ithaca College

http://www.ithaca.edu/stcee  

http://www.ithaca.edu/aging/schools  

http://www.thehistorycenter.net

For discussion – Knowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapter 14

Kottler and Galavan, Chapter 4

 

THANKSGIVING BREAK – NOV 24

Competing World Views in the Social Studies Classroom – Finish reading and prepare for a discussion of the Loewen and D’Souza books. The Comparative Book Critique is due Dec. 3

 

Week   13.   December 1

Instructional Assessment Strategies in the Social Studies: Essays, Objective Question and the N.Y. State Regents Examinations.

 

DBQs - Document Based Questions and the Use of Primary Sources.

Document Based Assessment Activities for US History

Document Based Assessment for Global History

Regents Exam Prep Center: http://regentsprep.org

For discussion – Knowing Teaching and Learning History, Chapters 9 and 22

                       

Week   14.    Dec. 8

Alumni Networking Project – summary, results and next steps

Professional collaboration, communication and networking

Kottler and Gallavan, Chapters 8 and 12

The Social Studies Teaching Profession: Past, Present and Future.    

Final Revisions of Unit Plans are due!  

Teaching lessons with your mentor teachers.

 

Week   15.    

EXAMINATION WEEK

Field Experience – visit Lehman Alternative Community School and Media Literacy, Project LookSharp: interpreting varied media in the 7-12 social studies classroom, Chris Sperry, IC Alumni Mentor

 

Teaching lessons with your mentor social studies teachers.

The Final Portfolio is due December

 

         

 

 

Scoring Rubric for NCSS Standards within Unit Plan

 

NCSS Standards

3 points

2 points

1 point

0 points

1.1 Culture and Cultural Diversity. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of anthropology and history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.2 Time, Continuity, and Change. Be familiar with the history of the United States, western civilization, and non-western society

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.3 People, Places, and Environments. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of geography

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.4 Individual Development and Identity. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of psychology

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.5 Individuals, Groups, and Institutions. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of sociology and history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.6 Power, Authority, and Governance. Understand the basic scholarly concepts of political science and history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.7 Production, Distribution, and Consumption. Understand the basic concepts of micro- and macro-economics

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.8 Science, Technology, and Society. Understand the manner by which science and technology have enhanced or threatened the development of human society in history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.9 Global Connections. Understand that our planet has been exposed to an ever-increasing human interdependence in a world made smaller by improvements in communication, transportation, and trade throughout history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

1.10 Civic Ideals and Practices. Understand the basic concepts of citizenship in a democratic society today and throughout history

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

NCSS standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards

NCSS standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

NCSS standards are not

included and/or lack

congruence with unit

rationale and goals.

 

               

 

 

                Scoring Rubric for Unit Plan

NCSS

NYSED

Indicator

3 Points

2 Points

1 Point

0 Points

 

 

 

Context

 

A description of the context includes in-depth information about the school, community, classroom, and students for whom the unit has been designed.  This contextual information is considered in terms of its implications for planning.

 

A description of the context includes information about the school, classroom, and students for whom the unit has been designed.

 

Some contextual information is included but not enough to help guide the development of appropriate plans.

 

A description of the context is not provided.

 

 

3.1

 

Rationale

 

A clear, thoughtful, well-written rationale establishes the importance of and reasons for teaching this unit. The unit’s “big ideas” or essential questions are identified and discussed.  Theoretical perspective and/or research support is provided.

 

A clear, thoughtful, well-written rationale establishes the importance of and reasons for teaching this unit. The unit’s “big ideas” or essential questions are identified and discussed.

 

A rationale is included and describes the reasons for teaching this unit.

 

A rationale for including this unit in

the curriculum is not provided or is

vague and superficial.

All

NCSS

Standards

 

2.4

 

Standards

 

State, national, and/or common core standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals.  These standards are used as the basis for developing a coherent, carefully-sequenced plan for instruction and assessment that support student learning. 

 

State, national, and/or common core standards are identified and clearly aligned with the unit rationale and goals. Instruction and assessment for the unit support the identified standards.

 

State, national, and/or common core standards are identified and aligned with the unit rationale and goals.

 

Standards are not included and/or

 lack congruence with unit rationale

 and goals.

 

 

2.4

 

Unit Goals

 

Clear, meaningful, challenging, multidisciplinary goals and/or themes are provided for the unit and are congruent with the unit rationale.  Essential knowledge/skills and enduring understandings are identified. 

 

Unit goals are congruent with the unit rationale and are clear, meaningful, and challenging.

 

Unit goals appear congruent with the unit rationale but are very general and unclear.

 

Unit goals are not included and/or

lack congruence with the unit rationale.

 

 

3.6, 5.1, 5.2

 

Assessments

 

Assessment plan includes a carefully-selected and sequenced set of multiple methods of both formative and summative assessment, with clear alignment to unit goals and a clear rationale for selection of assessments that are culturally sensitive and fair.

 

Assessment plan includes varied formative and summative assessments, aligned with unit goals and supported by a rationale for the selection of assessments that are culturally sensitive and fair.

 

Assessment plan includes formative and summative assessment but assessments are not clearly aligned with unit goals and/or the rationale provided for selection is not clear.

 

Assessment plan includes only

one method of assessment and/

lacks alignment with unit goals

or rationale and/or lacks a rationale

 for selection of assessments.

 

 

1.2, 1.6, 2.3, 3.1, 3.4

 

Literacy

 

State literacy standards are identified and congruent with the unit’s goals. Research-supported instructional practices in reading, writing, vocabulary, and oral language development are effectively integrated throughout the unit.  Plan shows respect for varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

 

 

State literacy standards are identified and addressed through the use of several approaches to literacy instruction and scaffolding in reading, writing, vocabulary, and/or oral language development.  Plan shows respect for varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

 

State literacy standards are identified as being addressed in the unit, but the integration of literacy instruction and scaffolding in the unit is not clear.

 

There is little or no evidence of

literacy being incorporated into the unit.

 

 

 

1.6, 3.4, 3.5

 

Technology

 

A range of media/technology is incorporated into the unit in carefully designed and innovative ways and is logically congruent with the unit goals, identified standards, and planned instruction.

 

 

Media/technology is integrated in a meaningful way into the larger instructional plan for the unit.

 

Media/technology is used in the unit, but its use is not clearly congruent with the unit.

 

There is no evidence of media/technology

being used in the unit or the media/tech

use is alluded to but not clear.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1

 

Weekly Plan

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, coherent weekly plan that contains varied, carefully-sequenced, innovative, developmentally-appropriate, culturally-responsive approaches to content-rich and multidisciplinary instruction. Multiple, logical forms of assessment are used.

 

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich weekly plan.  Lessons are varied and build logically upon one another.  A plan for assessment is included.

 

Weekly plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or coherence and/or weekly plan lacks a required component.

 

Weekly plan is missing required components

and/or is so general or disorganized that it is

difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #1

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #2

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #3

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #4

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging  instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation  in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.1, 3.4, 5.1, 5.2

 

Lesson Plan #5

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, developmentally-appropriate, content-rich, and culturally-responsive plan that demonstrates innovative, meaningful, challenging instruction and multiple approaches to differentiation in support of diverse learners.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives.

 

All required components are included in a detailed, well-organized, content-rich plan that could be followed easily by another teacher.  Planned procedures and assessments are congruent with objectives. Lesson includes meaningful differentiation.

 

Lesson plan is generally well-organized but would benefit from additional detail or clarity and/or lesson plan lacks congruence among objectives, procedures, and assessments.

 

The lesson plan is missing a required

component and/or is so general or

disorganized that it is difficult to follow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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